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I am using switch statement to check the argument provided on the terminal. The provided script is working fine if the end user provide

      $perl test.pl -help 

but when user is giving the under below option it subroutine is not getting called recursively.

      $perl test.pl -link abc -web test.com

Plz suggest!

      use Switch;
      #perl test.pl -help
      #perl test.pl -link abc -web test.com

      sub CheckArgument {

       my ($argv)   = shift @_;
       local $\     = "\n";
       print "\$argv : $argv\n";

       switch($argv) {
                  case /-help/ {
                             print "Usage : $0 -link <link name> -web <website name>";
                             print "Usage : $0 -list_web_name";
                             exit;
                  }
                  case /-list_web_name/ {
                             print "Currently Support following site";
                             foreach (qw/abc/) {
                                        print "$_";
                              }
                             exit;
                   }
                  case /-link/ {
                             CheckArgument($ARGV[3]);
                  }
                  case /-web/ {
                             print "argument provided : @ARGV\n";       
                  }
                  default {
                             CheckArgument("-help");
                  }
        }
       }
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3  
Why don't you use GetOpt::Long? –  kjprice Apr 24 '13 at 21:11
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Switch is an experimental module not meant for actual use. 5.10 introduced a switch statement in the form of given/when.

By the way, you might want to look at Getopt::Long to handle some of that work far better.

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Actually, in Perl 5.17, they decided that given/when is experimental, too. –  cjm Apr 24 '13 at 21:59
    
@cjm, No, just smart matching. The problem with smart-matching are two-fold: it derives type information from storage format, and it doesn't necessarily provide what a person expects of X ~~ Y. Instead, use of objects that overload smart-matching is promoted, so you can do X ~~ any(Y) and some such. –  ikegami Apr 24 '13 at 22:03
    
I don't have 5.17.X installed, but it's my understanding that given itself got marked experimental. (Although I'm not sure how you can mark something experimental 4 major releases after it was first introduced.) –  cjm Apr 24 '13 at 22:11
    
hum, after a second look, I think it give a warning because it's smart-matching is usually used implicitly with it. –  ikegami Apr 24 '13 at 22:16
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First of all, the Switch source filter is deprecated. Please do not use it.

Here is a rewrite of your code without recursion that may be easier to understand:

use 5.010;
sub CheckArgument {
  my $_ = shift;

  ARG: {
    if (/-help/) {
      say "Usage: $0 -link <link-name> -web <website-name>";
      say "Usage: $0 -list_web_name";
    } elsif (/-list_web_name/) {
      say "Currently supporting following sites:";
      say for qw/a b c/;
    } elsif (/-link/) {
      $_ = $ARGV[3];
      redo ARG;
    } elsif (/-web/) {
      say "arguments provided : @ARGV\n";       
    } else {
      $_ = "-help";
      redo ARG;
    }
  }
  exit;
}

If we set @ARGV to qw/ -link x y -web/, and invoke that sub with the @ARGV as arguments, we would get following output:

arguments provided : -link x y -web

First, we look at -link. This causes us to put the 4th element in @ARGV to the variable we are looking at. This will hold -web on the next iteration, which will output all command line arguments. This parsing strategy is in no way robust.

Better than recursion would be to loop while you have unprocessed arguments. If wou recognize a switch, remove the switch and its values from the arglist. When you don't understand an argument, print the usage:

use 5.010;
# I use 5.010 for the C<say> function, but if we're already using it,
# we could just as well use given/when. Wouldn't make it much prettier.
sub ProcessArguments {
  ARG: while (@_) {
    my $_ = shift;
    if (/\A-?-list_web_name\z/) {
      say "Currently supporting following sites:";
      say for qw/a b c/;
    } elsif (/\A-?-link\z/) {
      my $link_name = shift;
      shift() =~ /\A-?-web\z/ or do { Usage(); exit };
      my $website_name = shift;
      do_something_with($link_name, $website_name);
    } elsif (/\A-?-web\z/) {
      my $website_name = shift;
      shift() =~ /\A-?-link\z/ or do {Usage(); exit };
      my $link_name = shift;
      do_something_with($link_name, $website_name);
    } else {
      Usage();
      exit;
    }
  }
}
sub Usage {
  say "Usage: $0 -link <link-name> -web <website-name>";
  say "Usage: $0 -list_web_name";
}

Oh, this awful boilerplate, the endless repetition. Wouldn't it be great if somebody had already written a something that already gets options for us? Like, a CPAN module?

use Getopt::Long;
use 5.010;
sub ProcessArguments {
  my $list_web_name;
  my $help;
  my ($link_name, $website_name);
  GetOptions
    'list-web-name' => \$list_web_name,
    'help'          => \$help,
    'link=s'        => \$link_name,
    'web=s'         => \$website_name;
  if ($help) {
      Usage();
  } elsif ($list_web_name) {
      say "Currently supporting following sites:";
      say for qw/a b c/;
  } elsif (defined $link_name and defined $website_name) {
      do_something_with($link_name, $website_name);
  } else {
      Usage();
  }
}

And thats a way its done.

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