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I have a table that is something like this (i've removed a lot of fields for making this easy to explain). orderId is a int non unique value that is used to show how important a row is (and I order by it when returning data)

CREATE TABLE `my_images` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `orderId` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `slug` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `imageFilename` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `thumb200` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `thumb600` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `md5hash` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `orderId` (`orderId`),
  KEY `thumb600` (`thumb600`),
  KEY `slug` (`slug`),
  KEY `multiple_1` (`md5hash`,`orderId`,`thumb200`,`thumb600`),
  KEY `md5hash` (`md5hash`),
  KEY `thumb200` (`thumb200`),
  KEY `thumb200_2` (`thumb200`,`orderId`),
  KEY `orderId_2` (`orderId`,`thumb600`,`thumb200`),
  KEY `thumb600_2` (`thumb600`,`orderId`),
  KEY `thumb600_3` (`thumb600`,`orderId`),
  KEY `orderId_3` (`orderId`,`thumb600`),
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

Yes - there are lots of indexes covering orderId. Its a mix of trying things for fix current problem and also cos I use those fields in a WHERE statement.

Anyway if I run this command:

explain SELECT id FROM my_images
 ORDER BY orderId asc

it outputs this ("Using Index")

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  my_images   index   NULL    orderId 4   NULL    174553  Using index

which is expected - orderId is an index.

but if I do this:

explain SELECT id,   thumb600, imageFilename,  slug FROM my_images
 ORDER BY orderId asc

it outputs this (Using filesort):

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  my_images   ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    174553  Using filesort

and weirdly if I do this

explain SELECT id,  md5hash  FROM my_images
 ORDER BY orderId asc

it says "Using index; Using filesort"

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  my_images   index   NULL    multiple_1  775 NULL    174553  Using index; Using filesort

The reason I noticed is because I saw a slow query, which was basically ' select (a bunch of fields) order by orderId limit 4000,3 ' which was taking a long time and after running the explain command saw that. What can be done so it always uses index? Would I have to make an index that has ALL the fields that I select? If so does the order of the fields in the index matter?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you select columns not covered by the index, the engine will have to make table lookups to get values of those columns.

Since you are selecting the whole table anyway (not using WHERE or LIMIT), it's faster to sequentially scan the table and then sort it rather than do lots of key seeks.

Also, MySQL can't do late row lookups, this means that it always looks up the table before counting off the offset, even when using the index.

If you are ordering by a non-PK field in an InnoDB table, try this:

SELECT  i.*
FROM    (
        SELECT  id
        FROM    my_images
        ORDER BY
                orderId
        LIMIT   4000, 3
        ) q
JOIN    my_images i
ON      i.id = q.id

See this article in my blog for explanations:

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thanks for this. (BTW i was using WHERE and LIMIT but just ommited that to make it easier to read here) –  slycat Apr 25 '13 at 11:11
    
u have no idea how much this helped. was going mad trying to work out why a mysql table with lots of rows just wasn't fast even with an index. ur blog post explained it well. –  slycat Apr 25 '13 at 11:30

add index order id then the columns you want as the index

the problem is that when you add other columns then filesort is like sticky notes it will have to recollect them

however if you have the columns in the index (it has to be one index with 4-6 columns) as each query will only use one index. the columns will go along for the ride

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