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I have a non-closing stream class that's wrapped in a using block with a binary reader, but for some reason when the block ends, my non-closing stream still closes.

The stream is defined as:

internal class NonClosingStream : Stream, IDisposable
{
    private Stream baseStream;

    public NonClosingStream(Stream baseStream)
    {
        this.baseStream = baseStream;
    }

    public override bool CanRead{ get { return baseStream.CanRead; } }
    public override bool CanSeek{ get { return baseStream.CanSeek; } }
    public override bool CanWrite { get { return baseStream.CanWrite; } }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        baseStream.Flush();
    }

    public override long Length { get { return baseStream.Length; } }

    public override long Position
    {
        get { return baseStream.Position; }
        set { baseStream.Position = value; }
    }

    public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        return baseStream.Read(buffer, offset, count);   
    }

    public override long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
    {
        return baseStream.Seek(offset, origin);
    }

    public override void SetLength(long value)
    {
        baseStream.SetLength(value);
    }

    public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        baseStream.Write(buffer, offset, count);
    }

    public override void Close()
    {
        // Disconnects from base stream, but does not close it
        this.baseStream = null;
    }

    void IDisposable.Dispose()
    {
        // Disconnects from base stream, but does not close it
        this.baseStream = null;
    }
}

and the read block looks like this:

public T Deserialize<T>(Stream stream)
{
    using (NonClosingStream nonClosingStream = new NonClosingStream(stream))
    using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(nonClosingStream, Encoding.ASCII, true))
    {
        // Read the type name, then convert it to an actual type
        String typeName = reader.ReadString();
        Type graphType = AvailableTypes.GetType(typeName);

        // If a deserializer for this type already exists, use it.
        if (deserializerFunctions.ContainsKey(graphType))
        {
            return (T)deserializerFunctions[graphType](reader);
        }

        // Otherwise, create one and use it
        T graph = (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(graphType);

        typeof(ServiceSerializer).GetMethod("DeserializeObject",
                BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static)

            .MakeGenericMethod(graphType)
            .Invoke(this, new Object[] { reader, graph });

        return graph;
    }
}

what am I doing wrong?

Update

So I wrote this little diddy:

static void Main()
{
    MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();
    using (NonClosingStream nonCloser = new NonClosingStream(stream))
    using (BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(nonCloser))
    using (BinaryReader reader= new BinaryReader(nonCloser))
    {
        writer.Write("Lorem ipsum");

        stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        String data = reader.ReadString();

        Console.WriteLine(data);
    }

    stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

    using (NonClosingStream nonCloser = new NonClosingStream(stream))
    using (BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(nonCloser))
    using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(nonCloser))
    {
        writer.Write("Lorem ipsum");

        stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        String data = reader.ReadString();

        Console.WriteLine(data);
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}

and it seems to work fine, the stream stays open like it's supposed to. So I guess the consensus is right. Somehow I'm closing the stream elsewhere. When I figure out what I'll post the results. Thanks all.

Update

Gaaaahhh, I figured out the problem. So the way the code works is that while it serializes/deserializes an object, it then builds a customized serializer out of expression trees and then compiles it so that future serializations are more fluid. That means my code is littered with stuff like this:

Action<BinaryReader, Object> assignmentAction = delegate(BinaryReader bReader, Object oGraph)
{
    bReader.ReadByte();      // Read the next action
    bReader.ReadString();    // Read the field name
    bReader.ReadByte();      // Read the field type

    // Call the assignment lambda
    assignmentLambda(reader, deserializerFunctions[primitiveType], (T)oGraph);
};

did you catch that? No? Neither did I apparently. Let's add some context:

private static void DeserializeObject<T>(BinaryReader reader, T graph)
{
    ...

    Action<BinaryReader, Object> assignmentAction = delegate(BinaryReader bReader, Object oGraph)
    {
        bReader.ReadByte();      // Read the next action
        bReader.ReadString();    // Read the field name
        bReader.ReadByte();      // Read the field type

        // Call the assignment lambda
        assignmentLambda(reader, deserializerFunctions[primitiveType], (T)oGraph);
    };

    ...
}

The lambda is closing over reader from the outside block, instead of using the bReader provided when the cached deserializer runs. Hence, when the deserializer runs, it's using an already discarded Binary reader object rather than the fresh one being provided to it. I guess the issue wasn't that I was closing the stream, but that I was using a disposed reader. At least that explains why it would work once, and then fail the second time, since the second time it relies on the cached deserializer. Oops!

Thanks all.

share|improve this question
2  
Can't see any problem here. How do you know that it was closed? How do you know it was closed here? –  usr Apr 24 '13 at 21:54
    
Because if I unwrap them, it works fine. –  sircodesalot Apr 24 '13 at 21:56
    
How do you know that the underlying stream is closed? What are you doing to it afterwards? Is there more data on the stream after reading the serialized object? –  antlersoft Apr 24 '13 at 21:56
    
What does unwrap mean? I cannot see the relation to my questions. –  usr Apr 24 '13 at 21:57
1  
Ok how do you know the stream is being closed here? You are probably closing the stream elsewhere. Use the debugger instead of removing the using to get a more finegrained result. –  usr Apr 24 '13 at 22:02

3 Answers 3

Since your stream does not create inner stream most likely outer code closes your inner stream. Chances are your code look like:

 NonClosingStream nonClosing;
 using(var stream = new FileStream(...))
 {
   nonClosing = new NonClosingStream(stream );
  ....
 } 
 // inner stream now closed and nonClosing will fail all operations.
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is a comment because it is highly speculative. –  usr Apr 24 '13 at 22:00
    
That's what I'm expecting is happening, but how could it just close the stream for me? –  sircodesalot Apr 24 '13 at 22:00
    
@usr - probably, unfortunately code in comments is less than readable :( –  Alexei Levenkov Apr 24 '13 at 22:01
    
@sircodesalot ? using disposes/closes object at the end - so if you have using for stream you pass to NonClosingStream that inner stream will be closed by end of using block... –  Alexei Levenkov Apr 24 '13 at 22:02
    
But my non-closing stream passes all stream operations to the baseStream but I'm careful never to close the stream myself. Which means something else is closing it for me. –  sircodesalot Apr 24 '13 at 22:04
void IDisposable.Dispose()

Your class has two Dispose() methods. The one you explicitly implemented. And the one that you inherited from the Stream class. Problem is, BinaryStream doesn't know beans about yours. It only knows about the one that Stream implements. Furthermore, when you use the BinaryStream(Stream) constructor, the BinaryStream object assumes ownership of the passed Stream object. Which means it will dispose that stream when it gets disposed itself. Perhaps you see the problem now, the inherited Dispose() method will be called, not yours. And it closes the base stream.

This is why Stream implements the Dispose pattern. You'll need to make it look like this instead:

internal class NonClosingStream : Stream {
    protected override Dispose(bool disposing) {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah , I did that initially, but there was no difference in behavior. Even if it did close out my non-closing stream somehow (which doesn't really make sense), it shouldn't be able to close out this.baseStream. Not in front of the code at the moment though, but I'll try it again tomorrow. –  sircodesalot Apr 25 '13 at 3:38

It depends on whether the stream which is being wrapped by your NonClosingStream class is referenced elsewhere. If not, then the underlying stream will have no references, so at some point afterwards its finalizer will close the stream.

share|improve this answer
    
If there are no further references he could not observe the stream being closed. –  usr Apr 24 '13 at 21:58
    
He could if it was something like a file now accessable because there is no longer any process associated with it. –  Mark Bertenshaw Apr 24 '13 at 22:05

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