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So, we have a HashMap, and a transient Entry[] table inside it. In many methods, for example, in clear(), we copy table:

public void clear() {
    modCount++;
    Entry[] tab = table;
    for (int i = 0; i < tab.length; i++)
        tab[i] = null;
    size = 0;
}

But why we do Entry[] tab = table? What's wrong in next code?

public void clear() {
    modCount++;
    for (int i = 0; i < table.length; i++)
        table[i] = null;
    size = 0;
}

As far as i know, tab is only a reference to table, and, for at first sight, is just a wasting of space.

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1  
Wasting what space? Method-local variables are cheap and go away as soon as the method is complete. This is an example of a technique -- less necessary in modern JVMs, but necessary when HashMap was originally written -- to cache object fields in local variables for speed. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 24 '13 at 22:33
    
You don't copy the table. This is not C++, there is no copy constructor or anything involved. You're operating on references and references only. The cost of this assignment is next to nothing. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Apr 24 '13 at 22:40
    
Louis Wasserman, could you please explain, how caching object fields in local variables can speed up? Daniel Kamil Kozar, yes, i know this. –  user2317480 Apr 24 '13 at 22:46

2 Answers 2

 for (int i = 0; i < table.length; i++)
        tab[i] = null;

You are right, tab and table both point to the same object. The problem I see is using table in the for-conditional and tab in the for-body. You should use one or the other, but not both.

tab is unnecessary, but sometimes people do this for readability reasons. Doesn't make sense here, since table is more readable. If I were code reviewing this, I would strongly prefer the second version.

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I think it's just a typo, he most certainly means it to be table[i] = null; in the second example. –  Pescis Apr 24 '13 at 22:10
    
yes, forgot about it. Fixed tab[i] = null; => table[i] = null; –  user2317480 Apr 24 '13 at 22:22

It's just one locally scoped object reference. Not a lot of space there.

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Fixed tab => table –  user2317480 Apr 24 '13 at 22:19

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