Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would just like to know how to create a textbox that only allows the user to type numbers, one that allows numbers and a fullstops and one that only allows the user to type letters?

I used this code for Windows Form:

private void YearText_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e) //Textbox only accepts numbers
{
    char ch = e.KeyChar;
    if (!Char.IsDigit(ch) && ch != 8 && ch != 13)
    {
        e.Handled = true;
    }
}

private void NameText_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e) //Textbox only accepts letters
{
    if (!char.IsLetter(e.KeyChar) && !char.IsControl(e.KeyChar) && !char.IsWhiteSpace(e.KeyChar))
        e.Handled = true;
}

private void ResellPriceText_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e) //Textbox that allows only numbers and fullstops
{
    if (!char.IsControl(e.KeyChar)
        && !char.IsDigit(e.KeyChar)
        && e.KeyChar != '.')
    {
        e.Handled = true;
    }

    // only allow one decimal point
    if (e.KeyChar == '.'
        && (sender as TextBox).Text.IndexOf('.') > -1)
    {
        e.Handled = true;
    }
}

But I soon found out this can't be done with WPF. I'm not fussed about things such as the ability to paste letters/numbers.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

This can be done in WPF, in fact you can even do it with very similar event handler based code, however, don't this - it is a terrible user experience. This will prevent users from copying and pasting when they accidentally include surrounding spaces and will prevent entering scientific numbers e.g. 100e3.

Instead use validations (on the trimmed input) and prevent the user from continuing if the validations fail.

share|improve this answer
    
I second the idea of validating after the fact. I have never found it necessary to restrict what can be entered, only what can be submitted. –  Logarr Apr 25 '13 at 21:17
    
Entering a MAC address with only a-f and 0-9 is useful. Allowing a MAC address to be entered with characters out of range, and invalidating the input seems cumbersome to me. So I guess it depends on the use case. –  Mike de Klerk Aug 21 '13 at 11:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.