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I am making structs of pointers which point to structs. I've been googling like a madman and I can't figure out why the printf statement below gives different memory addresses. Could somebody explain this to me?

struct board_piece {
   board_piece* next;
   board_piece* prev;
} board_piece;

main (int argc, char *argv []) {

  board_piece *newPiece = malloc (sizeof (board_piece));
  board_piece *newPiece2 = malloc (sizeof (board_piece));
  newPiece->next = newPiece2;
  printf("%x, %x",  newPiece->next, newPiece2); //Why aren't these the same address?
}
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possible duplicate of Understanding C: Pointers and Structs –  Jean-Bernard Pellerin Apr 24 '13 at 23:30
    
At first glance, I agree with you. They should be the same. Also, as they are dynamically allocated, I don't think the compiler will be optimizing them out. Besides the %p option mentioned below, I would suggest looking at your values in a debugger to see when it says. –  Michael Dorgan Apr 24 '13 at 23:35
    
The code you posted is invalid. You've defined a type called struct board_piece, not board_piece. You define board_piece as an object name, but then use it as a type name. main should be defined with a return type of int. You're missing the required #include directives for <stdlib.h> and <stdio.h>. Please post actual copy-and-pasted code. –  Keith Thompson Apr 24 '13 at 23:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try using %p as your format specifier. You might be on a platform where pointers and integers are different sizes.

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-1. Even if pointers and integers were not the same size, the value printed should be the same. –  Gonzalo Apr 24 '13 at 23:42
2  
@Gonzalo: It depends on the calling conventions for variadic functions. He might be seeing the upper and lower half of a 64-bit pointer. –  Ben Jackson Apr 24 '13 at 23:43
    
Damn it. How do I undo the -1? :)... Done! –  Gonzalo Apr 24 '13 at 23:46
    
Yes that was the problem. –  user2278710 Apr 24 '13 at 23:50
    
%p expects a void *. You should cast that. –  Kerrek SB Apr 24 '13 at 23:57

First of all, your code doesn't compile due to a few errors. You need to declare your type before you can use it in the struct; and you are declaring a global variable, board_piece, not a type, because you didn't use typedef. Are you sure that the code you are running is actually the code that you think it is?

Second, as Ben Jackson points out, you should use %p for pointers, because pointers can be wider than integers. If you use %x which indicates an integer, and pass a pointer in, printf() may look in the wrong place for the value.

The following works for me, printing out the same value for both pointers:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct board_piece board_piece;

struct board_piece {
   board_piece* next;
   board_piece* prev;
};

int main () {

  board_piece *newPiece = malloc (sizeof (board_piece));
  board_piece *newPiece2 = malloc (sizeof (board_piece));
  newPiece->next = newPiece2;
  printf("%p, %p",  newPiece->next, newPiece2); //Why aren't these the same address?

  return 0;
}

I would recommend compiling with warnings enabled, and treated as errors. If you are using GCC or Clang, I generally recommend -Wall -Wextra -Werror; there is likely to be an equivalent set of options for MSVC. Note that when doing so, you need to fix a few more warnings, such as no return type declared for main and unused arguments. I've fixed those problems in the above, so it compiles without warnings.

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Sorry, I omitted a lot of code and that was part of it. –  user2278710 Apr 24 '13 at 23:50

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