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In my IsSame function I would like to return true if both pointers are pointing to objects of the same type. So only the middle call should return true. D1 and B shouldn't be considered the same.

The below seems to be exactly what I want but is it safe according to the standard?

#include <stdio.h>

class B { virtual void foo() {} };
class D1 : public B { };
class D2 : public B { };
class D3 : public B { };

bool IsSame(B*a, B*b) {
    if (a == 0 || b == 0)
        return false;
    return *(intptr_t*)a == *(intptr_t*)b;
}

int main() {
    D1 d1;
    D2 d2;
    D1 d1b;
    B b;
    printf("%d %d %d\n", IsSame(&d1, &d2), IsSame(&d1, &d1b), IsSame(&d1, &b));
}

Output:

0 1 0
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4  
The code doesn't even make sense. Why the defeferencing? –  Kerrek SB Apr 25 '13 at 0:06
5  
What's the point in converting to intptr_t*? –  GManNickG Apr 25 '13 at 0:08
4  
I guess you are trying to see if the two objects point to the same vtable? This is definitely not standard. –  jxh Apr 25 '13 at 0:11
2  
Can't you just use std::is_same<decltype(d1), decltype(d2)>::value (and similarly for the others)? –  Praetorian Apr 25 '13 at 0:19
2  
@acidzombie24: Both of them missed that you're trying to do dynamic type lookup. Those solutions only work at compile-time, with the static type. –  GManNickG Apr 25 '13 at 0:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are trying to see if the two objects have the same v-table. The C++ standard does not speak to the presence of a v-table pointer, let alone where it would be in an object's layout. So, your solution is trivially non-standard, and the behavior of your program is in fact undefined.

If you want to see if the two base pointers have the same derived type but without RTTI, you will need some mechanism to let you know the id of a derived type. This likely means a virtual method that returns an id that all the derived types have to implement.

share|improve this answer
    
Its a shame the standards don't specific a way to get the vtable ptr. –  acidzombie24 Apr 25 '13 at 0:58
    
@acidzombie24, as user315052 indicated, the point is that the standard doesn't say that a C++ implementation must use v-tables to implement virtual methods: it is the most common mechanism, but not the only way to do it. Consequently, the standard cannot possibly specify how to get a v-table pointer - there might not be one at all. The solution proposed by user315052 is probably the sanest one and it's what I would do. There is such a thing as trying to be too clever. –  Euro Micelli Apr 25 '13 at 1:42

The following seems to work:

#include<typeinfo>
#include<iostream>

class B { virtual void foo() {} };
class D1 : public B { };
class D2 : public B { };
class D3 : public B { };


template<typename T1, typename T2>
bool is_same(const T1& t1, const T2& t2) {
  return typeid(t1) == typeid(t2);
}

bool is_same_no_template(const B& b1, const B& b2) {
  return typeid(b1) == typeid(b2);
}

int main(){
    D1 d1;
    D2 d2;
    D1 d1b;
    B b;
    std::cout<<std::boolalpha
             <<"d1 == d2  ? "<<is_same(d1, d2)<<std::endl
             <<"d1 == d1b ? "<<is_same(d1, d1b)<<std::endl
             <<"d1 == b   ? "<<is_same(d1, b)<<std::endl;

    std::cout<<"No Template"<<std::endl;

    std::cout<<std::boolalpha
             <<"d1 == d2  ? "<<is_same_no_template(d1, d2)<<std::endl
             <<"d1 == d1b ? "<<is_same_no_template(d1, d1b)<<std::endl
             <<"d1 == b   ? "<<is_same_no_template(d1, b)<<std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Compiling with gcc 4.7.2 I get the following output:

[Prompt] g++ example.cpp -std=c++11
[Prompt] ./a.out
d1 == d2  ? false
d1 == d1b ? true
d1 == b   ? false
No Template
d1 == d2  ? false
d1 == d1b ? true
d1 == b   ? false

Beware that this code will not compile if you decide to compile without "run-time type information" (RTTI; the -fno-rtti compile flag in gcc).

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3  
You're using templates so T1 and T2 match at compile-time, so the purpose of typeid is really lost here. (This is why I deleted my answer.) You should match the question and only have B*'s at the time of comparison. –  GManNickG Apr 25 '13 at 0:22
    
@GManNickG, @acidzombie24: I'm afraid I don't understand ;( (sorry, beginner here). What about the version without templates? Also, could you elaborate on why is the purpose of typeid lost? –  Escualo Apr 25 '13 at 0:29
    
@acidzombie24: I deleted my answer because it had the same misinformation this answer has. This answer misses the point entirely by using the objects directly, so it has the types directly in the template arguments. I revised by answer to demonstrate the solution fully using dynamic lookup. –  GManNickG Apr 25 '13 at 0:29
    
@GManNickG: Your answer is good. I was just trying to figure out if typeid works when i disable runtime information. Why did you delete your answer? oh right i thought you use B* not templates. -edit- damn, I didnt edit in time –  acidzombie24 Apr 25 '13 at 0:30
1  
@acidzombie24: Your original code is undefined behavior. –  GManNickG Apr 25 '13 at 0:36

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