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What is the best approach to accessing a variable out of scope, see my current method:

// Define API
require_once( 'api.php' );
global $myapi;
$myapi = new LazyAPI( 'My API', 'myapi' );

class Content {

    function DoAction() {

        global $myapi;
        $key = $myapi->someFunc() . "-key";

    }

}

$content = $myapi->Content(); // LazyAPI is a class that loads classes in other files using reflection
$content->DoAction();

The issue I am facing (and am unable to test until further on) is redeclaring or reusing $myapi in other files. I have only used the global access modifer because I know it works, and I don't know if there is a better alternative. The idea is to be able to declare multiple $myapi variables and only accessible within the scope of the main file.

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closed as too localized by Andrew Barber Apr 25 '13 at 2:34

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Correct me if I'm wrong. But couldn't you just do require_once() at the top and instantiate the api inside the function DoAction()? – Tuan Apr 25 '13 at 0:57
    
The $myapi is used in multiple classes. – Brian Graham Apr 25 '13 at 0:58
    
I think you are looking for the singleton pattern. Create a factory class that returns the same instance of $myapi wherever you need it. – Tuan Apr 25 '13 at 1:01
    
The variable can't always be the same, but the name always needs to be the same. Making it static/etc. wouldn't work. – Brian Graham Apr 25 '13 at 1:06

Use depency injection

require_once( 'api.php' );

class Content {

    public function __construct($myapi) {
        $this->myapi = $myapi;
    }

    function DoAction() {
        $key = $this->myapi->someFunc() . "-key";
    }

}

$myapi = new LazyAPI('My API', 'myapi' );
$content = new Content($myapi);
$content->DoAction();

Some helpful slides about depency injection in PHP.

share|improve this answer
    
The variable $myapi needs to be a variable, as it's used in several classes. I know of passing the variable by constructor, but is there no better way? – Brian Graham Apr 25 '13 at 1:00
    
I should also point out something that makes this solution look "wrong" for me, please see the original post. – Brian Graham Apr 25 '13 at 1:03
    
@BrianGraham, with this way your class become testable, reusable, flexible... Yes, it's the best way. – sectus Apr 25 '13 at 1:05
    
See how I actually declare a new class? $content = $myapi->Content();. That's why $content = $myapi->Content($myapi); looks wrong and I don't want to use it. – Brian Graham Apr 25 '13 at 1:07
    
@BrianGraham, you can also use Factory. – sectus Apr 25 '13 at 1:07

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