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It seems jQuery data can link data to multiple elements. In the example below, both elements get both properties, although it would appear that it should only affect the #one element.

I assume this is expected behavior in jQuery, since it's changing an object?

<div id="one" class="thing"></div>
<div id="two" class="thing"></div>
<div id="three" class="thing"></div>
<script>
jQuery(function($) {
    $('.thing').data('obj',{a:'a'});

    $('#one').data('obj',$.extend($('#one').data('obj'),{one:'one'}));

    //Display:
    for (i in $('#one').data('obj')) {
        alert(i+' in obj.');
    }
    for (i in $('#two').data('obj')) {
        alert(i+' in obj.');
    }
})
</script>

JSFiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/qFZ6y/

I know initializing with .each() function to set individual datas solves this problem, but would this be considered a bug in javascript or jQuery??

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is actually a result of your use of $.extend, from the documentation:

Keep in mind that the target object (first argument) will be modified, and will also be returned from $.extend(). If, however, you want to preserve both of the original objects, you can do so by passing an empty object as the target:

var object = $.extend({}, object1, object2);

From your original code, the only change needed would be:

jQuery(function($) {
    $('.thing').data('obj',{a:'a'});

    $('#one').data('obj',$.extend({}, $('#one').data('obj'),{one:'one'}));

    //Display:
    for (i in $('#one').data('obj')) {
        alert(i+' in obj.');
    }
    for (i in $('#two').data('obj')) {
        alert(i+' in obj.');
    }
})

See the changes here: http://jsfiddle.net/potatosalad/qFZ6y/2/

Longer Explanation

For the following code block:

var a = {};
var b = {};
var c = {};

var debug = function() {
  console.log("  a.obj: %s", JSON.stringify($(a).data('obj')));
  console.log("  b.obj: %s", JSON.stringify($(b).data('obj')));
  console.log("  c.obj: %s", JSON.stringify($(c).data('obj')));
};

// a, b, and c all have the same obj
$([a, b, c]).data('obj', {x: true});
console.log("-- test 1 --");
console.log("a.obj = b.obj = c.obj = {\"x\":true}");
debug();

// extending the obj of any of them will affect all others
$(a).data('obj', $.extend($(a).data('obj'), {y: true}));
console.log("-- test 2 --");
console.log("$.extend(a.obj, {\"y\":true})");
debug();

// b.obj is now a different obj from a and c
$(b).data('obj', $.extend({}, $(b).data('obj'), {z: true}));
console.log("-- test 3 --");
console.log("$.extend({}, b.obj, {\"z\":true})");
debug();

// c.obj is still affected by changes to a.obj (b.obj is not)
$(a).data('obj').m = true
console.log("-- test 4 --");
console.log("a.obj.m = true");
debug();

// c.obj is now different from a.obj and b.obj
$(c).data('obj', {r: true})
console.log("-- test 5 --");
console.log("c.obj = {\"r\":true}");
debug();

// a.obj changes do not affect b.obj or c.obj
$(a).data('obj', $.extend($(a).data('obj'), {s: true}));
console.log("-- test 6 --");
console.log("$.extend(a.obj, {\"s\":true})");
debug();

The following results:

-- test 1 --
a.obj = b.obj = c.obj = {"x":true}
  a.obj: {"x":true}
  b.obj: {"x":true}
  c.obj: {"x":true}
-- test 2 --
$.extend(a.obj, {"y":true})
  a.obj: {"x":true,"y":true}
  b.obj: {"x":true,"y":true}
  c.obj: {"x":true,"y":true}
-- test 3 --
$.extend({}, b.obj, {"z":true})
  a.obj: {"x":true,"y":true}
  b.obj: {"x":true,"y":true,"z":true}
  c.obj: {"x":true,"y":true}
-- test 4 --
a.obj.m = true
  a.obj: {"x":true,"y":true,"m":true}
  b.obj: {"x":true,"y":true,"z":true}
  c.obj: {"x":true,"y":true,"m":true}
-- test 5 --
c.obj = {"r":true}
  a.obj: {"x":true,"y":true,"m":true}
  b.obj: {"x":true,"y":true,"z":true}
  c.obj: {"r":true}
-- test 6 --
$.extend(a.obj, {"s":true})
  a.obj: {"x":true,"y":true,"m":true,"s":true}
  b.obj: {"x":true,"y":true,"z":true}
  c.obj: {"r":true}
share|improve this answer

This is a side-effect of the fact that you are using the same object, as you mentioned. So it is not so much that it is changing data for things that don't match the selector, but rather that it is setting a value on an object that you happen to have set up as shared.

If you want to have the data not be shared, then you will need to set the data individually using an .each loop.

share|improve this answer

This is not a bug in any way.

Your code would do exactly the same if you had this:

var a = {a:'a'}, b = a;
b.c = "derp";
alert(a.c); // derp

This is because objects are passed by reference, not by value. To get individual objects, you should use the .each loop, as you mentioned.

share|improve this answer
    
"This is because objects are passed by reference, not by value." This is not accurate, as you probably know. Everything is passed by value, but some values are references. The distinction is important, because "pass by reference" usually implies behavior similar to C pointers, which is not the case in JS (var a = {a:'a'}, b = a; b = {}; a !== b // true). – bfavaretto Apr 25 '13 at 1:46

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