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I'm currently working on a home-grown analytics system, currently using MySQL 5.6.10 on Windows Server 2008 (moving to Linux soon, and we're not dead set on MySQL, still exploring different options, including Hadoop).

We've just done a huge import, and what was a lightning-fast query for a small customer is now unbearably slow for a big one. I'm probably going to add an entirely new table to pre-calculate the results of this query, unless I can figure out how to make the query itself fast.

What the query does is take @StartDate and @EndDate as parameters, and calculates, for every day of that range, the date, the number of new reviews on that date, a running total of number of reviews (including any before @StartDate), and the daily average rating (if there is no information for a given day, the average rating will be carried over from the previous day).

Available filters are age, gender, product, company, and rating type. Every review has 1-N ratings, containing at the very least an "overall" rating, but possibly more per customer/product, such as "Quality", "Sound Quality", "Durability", "Value", etc...

The API that calls this injects these filters based on user selection. If no rating type is specified, it uses "AND ratingTypeId = 1" in place of the AND clause comment in all three parts of the query I'll be listing below. All ratings are integers between 1 and 5, though that doesn't really matter to this query.

Here are the tables I'm working with:

CREATE TABLE `times` (
    `timeId` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `date` date NOT NULL,
    `month` char(7) NOT NULL,
    `quarter` char(7) NOT NULL,
    `year` char(4) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`timeId`),
    UNIQUE KEY `date` (`date`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM

CREATE TABLE `reviewCount` (
    `companyId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `productId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `createdOnTimeId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `ageId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `genderId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `totalReviews` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    PRIMARY KEY (`companyId`,`productId`,`createdOnTimeId`,`ageId`,`genderId`),
    KEY `companyId_fk` (`companyId`),
    KEY `productId_fk` (`productId`),
    KEY `createdOnTimeId` (`createdOnTimeId`),
    KEY `ageId_fk` (`ageId`),
    KEY `genderId_fk` (`genderId`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM

CREATE TABLE `ratingCount` (
    `companyId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `productId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `createdOnTimeId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `ageId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `genderId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `ratingTypeId` int(11) NOT NULL,
    `negativeRatings` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `positiveRatings` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `neutralRatings` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `totalRatings` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `ratingsSum` double unsigned DEFAULT '0',
    `totalRecommendations` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    PRIMARY KEY (`companyId`,`productId`,`createdOnTimeId`,`ageId`,`genderId`,`ratingTypeId`),
    KEY `companyId_fk` (`companyId`),
    KEY `productId_fk` (`productId`),
    KEY `createdOnTimeId` (`createdOnTimeId`),
    KEY `ageId_fk` (`ageId`),
    KEY `genderId_fk` (`genderId`),
    KEY `ratingTypeId_fk` (`ratingTypeId`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM

The 'times' table is pre-filled with every day from 1900-01-01 to 2049-12-31, and the two count tables are populated by an ETL script with a roll-up query grouped by company, product, age, gender, ratingType, etc...

What I'm expecting back from the query is something like this:

Date        NewReviews  CumulativeReviewsCount  DailyRatingAverage
2013-01-24  7020        10586                   4.017514595496247
2013-01-25  5505        16091                   4.058400718778077
2013-01-27  2043        18134                   3.992957746478873
2013-01-28  3280        21414                   3.983625730994152
2013-01-29  4648        26062                   3.921597633136095
...
2013-03-09  1608        60297                   3.9409722222222223
2013-03-10  470         60767                   3.7743682310469313
2013-03-11  1028        61795                   4.036697247706422
2013-03-13  494         62289                   3.857388316151203
2013-03-14  449         62738                   3.8282208588957056

I'm pretty sure I could pre-calculate everything grouped by age, gender, etc..., except for the average, but I may be wrong on that. If I had three reviews for two products on one day, with all other groups different, and one had a rating of 2 and 5, and the other a 4, the first would have a daily average of 3.5, and the second 4. Averaging those averages would give me 3.75, when I'd expect to get 3.66667. Maybe I could do something like multiplying the average for that grouping by the number of reviews to get the total rating sum for the day, sum those up, then divide them by total ratings count at the end. Seems like a lot of extra work, but it may be faster than what I'm currently doing. Speaking of which, here's my current query:

SET @cumulativeCount :=
    (SELECT coalesce(sum(rc.totalReviews), 0)
        FROM reviewCount rc
        INNER JOIN times dt ON rc.createdOnTimeId = dt.timeId
        WHERE dt.date < @StartDate
        -- AND clause for filtering by ratingType (default 1), age, gender, product, and company is injected here in C#
    );

SET @dailyAverageWithCarry :=
    (SELECT SUM(rc.ratingsSum) / SUM(rc.totalRatings)
        FROM ratingCount rc
        INNER JOIN times dt ON rc.createdOnTimeId = dt.timeId
        WHERE dt.date < @StartDate
        AND rc.totalRatings > 0
        -- AND clause for filtering by ratingType (default 1), age, gender, product, and company is injected here in C#

        GROUP BY dt.timeId
        ORDER BY dt.date DESC LIMIT 1
    );

SELECT
    subquery.d AS `Date`,
    subquery.newReviewsCount AS `NewReviews`,
    (@cumulativeCount := @cumulativeCount + subquery.newReviewsCount) AS `CumulativeReviewsCount`,
    (@dailyAverageWithCarry := COALESCE(subquery.dailyRatingAverage, @dailyAverageWithCarry)) AS `DailyRatingAverage`
FROM
    (
        SELECT 
            dt.date AS d,
            COALESCE(SUM(rc.totalReviews), 0) AS newReviewsCount,
            SUM(rac.ratingsSum) / SUM(rac.totalRatings) AS dailyRatingAverage
        FROM times dt
        LEFT JOIN reviewCount rc ON dt.timeId = rc.createdOnTimeId
        LEFT JOIN ratingCount rac ON dt.timeId = rac.createdOnTimeId
        WHERE dt.date BETWEEN @StartDate AND @EndDate
        -- AND clause for filtering by ratingType (default 1), age, gender, product, and company is injected here in C#

        GROUP BY dt.timeId
        ORDER BY dt.timeId
    ) AS subquery;

The query currently takes ~2 minutes to run, with the following row counts:

times       54787
reviewCount 276389
ratingCount 473683
age         122
gender      3
ratingType  28
product     70070

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'd either like to make this query much faster, or if it would be faster to do so, to pre-calculate the values grouped by date, age, gender, product, company, and ratingType, then do a quick roll-up query on that table.

UPDATE #1: I tried Meherzad's suggestions of adding indexes to times and ratingCount with:

ALTER TABLE times ADD KEY `timeId_date_key` (`timeId`, `date`);
ALTER TABLE ratingCount ADD KEY `createdOnTimeId_totalRatings_key` (`createdOnTimeId`, `totalRatings`);

Then ran my initial query again, and it was about 1s faster (~89s), but still too slow. I tried Meherzad's suggested query, and had to kill it after a few minutes.

As requested, here is the EXPLAIN results from my query:

id|select_type|table|type|possible_keys|key|key_len|ref|rows|Extra
1|PRIMARY|<derived2>|ALL|NULL|NULL|NULL|NULL|6808032|NULL
2|DERIVED|dt|range|PRIMARY,timeId_date_key,date|date|3|NULL|88|Using index condition; Using temporary; Using filesort
2|DERIVED|rc|ref|PRIMARY,companyId_fk,createdOnTimeId|createdOnTimeId|4|dt.timeId|126|Using where
2|DERIVED|rac|ref|createdOnTimeId,createdOnTimeId_total_ratings_key|createdOnTimeId|4|dt.timeId|614|NULL

I checked the cache read miss rate as mentioned in the article on buffer sizes, and it was

Key_reads 58303
Key_read_requests 147411279
For a miss rate of 3.9551247635535405672723319902814e-4

UPDATE #2: Solved! The indices definitely helped, so I'll give credit for the answer to Meherzad. What actually made the most difference was realizing that calculating the rolling average and daily/cumulative review counts in the same query was joining those two huge tables together. I saw that the variable initialization was done in two separate queries, and decided to try separating the two big queries into subqueries and then joining them based on the timeId. Now it runs in 0.358s with the following query:

SET @StartDate = '2013-01-24';
SET @EndDate = '2013-04-24';

SELECT 
    @StartDateId:=MIN(timeId), @EndDateId:=MAX(timeId)
FROM
    times
WHERE
    date IN (@StartDate , @EndDate);

SELECT 
    @CumulativeCount:=COALESCE(SUM(totalReviews), 0)
FROM
    reviewCount
WHERE
    createdOnTimeId < @StartDateId
    -- Add Filters
;

SELECT 
    @DailyAverage:=COALESCE(SUM(ratingsSum) / SUM(totalRatings), 0)
FROM
    ratingCount
WHERE
    createdOnTimeId < @StartDateId
        AND totalRatings > 0
        -- Add Filters
GROUP BY createdOnTimeId
ORDER BY createdOnTimeId DESC
LIMIT 1;

SELECT 
    t.date AS `Date`,
    COALESCE(q1.newReviewsCount, 0) AS `NewReviews`,
    (@CumulativeCount:=@CumulativeCount + COALESCE(q1.newReviewsCount, 0)) AS `CumulativeReviewsCount`,
    (@DailyAverage:=COALESCE(q2.dailyRatingAverage,
            COALESCE(@DailyAverage, 0))) AS `DailyRatingAverage`
FROM
    times t
        LEFT JOIN
    (SELECT 
        rc.createdOnTimeId AS createdOnTimeId,
            COALESCE(SUM(rc.totalReviews), 0) AS newReviewsCount
    FROM
        reviewCount rc
    WHERE
        rc.createdOnTimeId BETWEEN @StartDateId AND @EndDateId
        -- Add Filters
    GROUP BY rc.createdOnTimeId) AS q1 ON t.timeId = q1.createdOnTimeId
        LEFT JOIN
    (SELECT 
        rc.createdOnTimeId AS createdOnTimeId,
            SUM(rc.ratingsSum) / SUM(rc.totalRatings) AS dailyRatingAverage
    FROM
        ratingCount rc
    WHERE
        rc.createdOnTimeId BETWEEN @StartDateId AND @EndDateId
        -- Add Filters
    GROUP BY rc.createdOnTimeId) AS q2 ON t.timeId = q2.createdOnTimeId
WHERE
    t.timeId BETWEEN @StartDateId AND @EndDateId;

I had assumed that two subqueries would be incredibly slow, but they were insanely fast because they weren't joining completely unrelated rows. It also pointed out the fact that my earlier results were way off. For example, from above:

Date        NewReviews  CumulativeReviewsCount  DailyRatingAverage
2013-01-24  7020        10586                   4.017514595496247

Should have been, and now is:

Date        NewReviews  CumulativeReviewsCount  DailyRatingAverage
2013-01-24  599         407327                  4.017514595496247

The average was correct, but the join was screwing up the number of both new and cumulative reviews, which I verified with a single query.

I also got rid of the joins to the times table, instead determining the start and end date IDs in a quick initialization query, then just rejoined to the times table at the end.

Now the results are:

Date        NewReviews  CumulativeReviewsCount  DailyRatingAverage
2013-01-24  599         407327                  4.017514595496247
2013-01-25  551         407878                  4.058400718778077
2013-01-26  455         408333                  3.838926174496644
2013-01-27  433         408766                  3.992957746478873
2013-01-28  425         409191                  3.983625730994152
...
2013-04-13  170         426066                  3.874239350912779
2013-04-14  182         426248                  3.585714285714286
2013-04-15  171         426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-16  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-17  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-18  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-19  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-20  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-21  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-22  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-23  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622
2013-04-24  0           426419                  3.6202531645569622

The last few averages properly carry the earlier ones, too, since we haven't imported from that customer's data feed in about 10 days.

Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this query

You don't have necessary indexes to optimize your query

Table times add compound index on (timeId, dateId)
Table ratingCount add compound index on (createdOnTimeId, totalRatings)

As you have already mentioned that you are using various other AND filters according to the user input so create a compound index for those columns in the order which you are adding for their respective table Ex Table ratingCount compound index (createdOnTimeId, totalRatings, ratingType, age, gender, product, and company). NOTE This index will be useful only if you add these constraints in the query.

I'd also check to make sure your buffer pool is large enough to hold your indexes. You don't want indexes to be paging in and out of the buffer pool during a query.

Check your buffer pool size

BUFFER_SIZE

If you don't find any improvement in performance please post explain statement for your query also, it will help in understanding problem properly.

I have tried to understand your query and made a new one check whether it works or not.

 SELECT 
   * 
 FROM
 (SELECT
  dt.timeId 
  dt.date,
  COALESCE(SUM(rc.totalReviews), 0) AS `NewReviews`,
  (@cumulativeCount := @cumulativeCount + subquery.newReviewsCount) AS    `CumulativeReviewsCount`,
  (@dailyAverageWithCarry := COALESCE(SUM(rac.ratingsSum) / SUM(rac.totalRatings), @dailyAverageWithCarry)) AS `DailyRatingAverage`
  FROM
    times dt
  LEFT JOIN 
    reviewCount rc 
  ON 
    dt.timeId = rc.createdOnTimeId
  LEFT JOIN 
    ratingCount rac ON dt.timeId = rac.createdOnTimeId
  JOIN
    (SELECT @cumulativeCount:=0, @dailyAverageWithCarry:=0) tmp
  WHERE 
    dt.date < @EndDate
    -- AND clause for filtering by ratingType (default 1), age, gender, product, and company is injected here in C#

  GROUP BY 
    dt.timeId
  ORDER BY 
    dt.timeId
 ) AS subquery
 WHERE
    subquery.date>@StartDate;

Hope this helps....

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed answer. Giving it a shot now, but it brought up another question. Since there can be any combination of the filters, will I need an index for all possible combinations of those fields? – Chris Doggett Apr 25 '13 at 15:54
    
No... :) that wont be possible and feasible to add that much indexes for all possible combinations. I should have added that thing in answer. Avoid creating that index, create remaining index.. Is the query that I have mentioned working ?? – Meherzad Apr 25 '13 at 16:08
    
Updated with results of your suggestions. – Chris Doggett Apr 25 '13 at 19:38
    
As you posted the explain statement which shows that the derived tables returns round about 6-7 millions records and to do calculation on those records. You can try converting the left join to inner join if it returns correct records for you. Sorry for my query.. :P – Meherzad Apr 26 '13 at 5:29
    
Thanks again for the help. I updated the question with my solution. The indices helped cut the time by about half, and the rest of it was splitting the accumulation and averaging into two separate subqueries, then joining them. Wouldn't have imagined that would actually be faster, but it's down from an initial 89s to 0.325s, so you'll get the credit for the answer. – Chris Doggett Apr 26 '13 at 20:21

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