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#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    long long a=1,b=2,c=3;
    long long d=0x123456789ABC;
    long long e=0x000000000000;
    printf("%d,%d,%d\n",a,b,c);
    printf("%d,%d\n",d,e);
    return 1;
}

in a 32bit UBUNTU system, compiled by 32bit g++, the program above will print:

1,0,2
0,305419896

I guess that's because printf() reads arguments from stack at a step of 32bit according to "%d". So it firstly print out the lower 32 bits of d (i.e 0),and then the higher 32 bits of d (i.e 305419896) .

but when compiled by 64bit g++, it will print:

1,2,3
0,0

firstly the lower 32 bits of d (i.e 0),and then the lower 32 bits of e (i.e 305419896) . why is the difference? Does printf() in 32bit g++ and 64bit g++ deals arguments differently?


I just came up with a possible explanation. In 64bit system a 32bit sized integer actually takes 64bit memory, with higher 32 bits filled with 0s. so printf() jumps 64 bits for the next argument even when it's specified by a "%d"

×××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××× Problem solved~~I just tried to run the following program on 32bit system

long long d=0x004300420041;
long long e=0x000000000044;
printf("%c, %c\n",d,e);
printf("%d, %d\n",d,e);

and the output is A C 4325441 67

both "%c" and "%d" result in a jump of 32bit that means both int and char type takes 32bit memory in 32bit system, and 64bit memory in 64bit system. My assumed explanation above is certified I think :)

share|improve this question
    
I am wondering how to compile the code with 32bit g++ in 64bit system. –  MYMNeo Apr 25 '13 at 3:59
    
@MYMNeo sorry for my mistake. It is a 32bit g++ in 32bit system on a 64bit-CPU machine:) But can't a 64bit system instal a 32bit g++? –  night Apr 25 '13 at 4:04
    
I just came up with a possible explanation. In 64bit system a 32bit sized integer actually takes 64bit memory, with higher 32 bits filled with 0s. so printf() jumps 64 bits for the next argument even when it's specified by a "%d" –  night Apr 25 '13 at 4:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since your variables are long long, the only correct printf format to print them is %lld. Using anything else is asking for trouble and is undetermined behavior.

This works great on any system and any compiler (IdeOne demo):

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    long long a=1,b=2,c=3;
    long long d=0x123456789ABC;
    long long e=0x000000000000;
    printf("%lld,%lld,%lld\n",a,b,c);
    printf("%lld,%lld\n",d,e);
    return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I understand that the format specifiers and the argument type don't match. But what I want to know is why the 32bit program and the 64bit program performs differently –  night Apr 25 '13 at 4:29
1  
Because once you use incorrect specifier, you will get implementation-specific behavior, which is non-determined. For some systems, you get 32-bit alignment. For others, you get 64-bit. For yet another, you may get 128-bit. It will differ for big-endian vs low-endian system. It may depend on compilation options regarding alignment and/or endianness (i.e. ARM CPU can run with different endianness). This is similar to using uninitialized variables. Often, int x; will initialize it to 0, but it is not guaranteed. In other words, don't do this! –  mvp Apr 25 '13 at 4:39
    
Yes this is an alignment problem. I was asked in a test what the program will put out in a 32bit little-endian system. of course I won't do this in a serious development. thanks for your answer! –  night Apr 25 '13 at 5:02

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