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I am trying to write a line of code in PHP, and this is probably a stupid question but I'm new to coding. I get this error when I try to run my php page:

"Error in query preparation/execution. Array ( [0] => Array ( [0] => 42000 [SQLSTATE] => 42000 [1] => 1013 [code] => 1013 [2] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 11.0][SQL Server]The objects "ACTION" and "action" in the FROM clause have the same exposed names. Use correlation names to distinguish them. [message] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 11.0][SQL Server]The objects "ACTION" and "action" in the FROM clause have the same exposed names. Use correlation names to distinguish them. ) )"

My question is simply how do I use a correlation name for the table name? I have a table called "action" and I am trying to write a statement that contains inner joins, so the database doesn't like that I'm trying to perform the INNER JOIN ACTION on my action table.. go figure!

I've tried to research it, but I keep finding complex examples of setting correlation names. Any help is greatly appreciated!

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check out this article for more details on how to do this. It comes down to what Ryan showed but gives a bit more details.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187455(v=sql.90).aspx

Also here is another good reading on how to use these correctly with a lot of examples.

http://sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2009/10/08/bad-habits-to-kick-using-table-aliases-like-a-b-c-or-t1-t2-t3.aspx

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1  
Thank you! The examples definitely help. Something so simple, but I just wasn't familiar with it. – Kelley May 8 '13 at 0:12

You just need to use unique aliases for each case where you use the action table. You did not show your query, but it would be something like this:

SELECT *
FROM   ACTION a1
INNER JOIN ACTION a2 ON ...

This way, the intended use of each instance of the same table is clear to the query parser.

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