Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How would I be able to manipulate the output text of grep.

Right now I am using the command:

grep -i "<url>" $file  >> ./txtFiles/$file.txt

This would output something like this:

<url>http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/chicken_curry_salad/</url>

and then the next text will go to the next line.

How would I be able to get rid of the <url> and </url> and stop it from going to the next line at the end.

share|improve this question
    
get rid of the what? maybe you want to remove the new line character, in that case pipe it in tr "\n" " " –  lc2817 Apr 25 '13 at 5:31

2 Answers 2

sed '/<\/*url>/!d;s///g'
  • <\/*url> matches both start and end tag
  • delete lines that dont have this
  • then remove all cases of this pattern

With your example, it might look like this

sed '/<\/*url>/!d;s///g' $file >> ./txtFiles/$file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this works. One last thing though, it still goes to the next line after the url. Do you know how I would be able to get rid of this so that the next text would be able to just follow right after. –  user1804266 Apr 25 '13 at 23:10
    
or maybe it is how I am adding the next line. I am using printf, so I am assuming that that is what is causing it to go the next line for the following text. Is there something else I should be using to append the text at the end of the line, instead of at a new line? –  user1804266 Apr 25 '13 at 23:28

Single commands:

sed -in '/<url>/ { s|<url>\(.*\)</url>|\1| ; p ; }' INPUT > OUTPUT

Or with awk:

awk -F "</?url>" '/<url>/ { print $2 }' INPUT > OUTPUT

Note: both might give you invalid output if more than one <url>...</url> patterns are occurring on a single line. The sed version might fail if the <url>...</url> contains any pipe (|) character.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.