Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In javascript we can do something like this :

var x = {
  'name' : 'john',
  'modifiedName' : function () { return this.name + ' <- modified'}
};

so x.modifiedName() returns john <- modified

How to do that on dart ?

I want to use some of the value from a Map to return a value for a key, like the javascript example.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason you don't want to create a Dart class for this? –  Juniper Belmont Apr 26 '13 at 0:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not with map literals. But you can make your own map class, and there you have multiple ways to achieve this.

As method

import "dart:collection";

class MyMap extends LinkedHashMap {

  String modifiedName() {
    String name = this["name"];
    return "$name <- modified";
  }

}

void main() {
  MyMap map = new MyMap();
  map["name"] = "John";
  print(map.modifiedName());
  map["name"] = "Harry";
  print(map.modifiedName());
}

As property

import "dart:collection";

class MyMap extends LinkedHashMap {

  String _modifiedName() {
    String name = this["name"];
    return "$name <- modified";
  }

  String get modifiedName => _modifiedName();

}

void main() {

  MyMap map = new MyMap();
  map["name"] = "John";
  print(map.modifiedName);
  map["name"] = "Harry";
  print(map.modifiedName);

}

As map key

import "dart:collection";

class MyMap extends LinkedHashMap {

  String operator [](String key) {
    if(key == "modifiedName") {
      String n = this["name"];
      return "$n <- modified";
    }
    return super[key];
  }

}

void main() {

  MyMap map = new MyMap();
  map["name"] = "John";
  print(map["modifiedName"]);
  map["name"] = "Harry";
  print(map["modifiedName"]);

}
share|improve this answer

You could do it this way:

var x;
x = {
    'name' : 'john',
    'modifiedName' : () => x['name'] + ' <- modified'
};
print(x['modifiedName']());

So, instead of this you can just use x, as long as you use x after it has been declared.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.