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I engaged a problem with inherited Controls in Windows Forms and need some advice on it.

I do use a base class for items in a List (selfmade GUI list made of a panel) and some inherited controls that are for each type of data that could be added to the list.

There was no problem with it, but I now found out, that it would be right, to make the base-control an abstract class, since it has methods, that need to be implemented in all inherited controls, called from the code inside the base-control, but must not and can not be implemented in the base class.

When I mark the base-control as abstract, the Visual Studio 2008 Designer refuses to load the window.

Is there a way to get the Designer work with the base-control made abstract?

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I had this exact same situation, sooo frustrating –  Allen Rice Mar 9 '10 at 5:07
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8 Answers

up vote 49 down vote accepted

I KNEW there had to be a way to do this (and I found a way to do this cleanly). Sheng's solution is exactly what I came up with as a temporary workaround but after a friend pointed out that the Form class eventually inherited from an abstract class, we SHOULD be able to get this done. If they can do it, we can do it.

We went from this code to the problem

Form1 : Form

Problem

public class Form1 : BaseForm
...
public abstract class BaseForm : Form

This is where the initial question came into play. As said before, a friend pointed out that System.Windows.Forms.Form implements a base class that is abstract. We were able to find...

Proof of a better solution

From this, we knew that it was possible for the designer to show a class that implemented a base abstract class, it just couldn't show a designer class that immediately implemented a base abstract class. There had to be at max 5 inbetween, but we tested 1 layer of abstraction and initially came up with this solution.

Initial Solution

public class Form1 : MiddleClass
...
public class MiddleClass : BaseForm
... 
public abstract class BaseForm : Form
... 

This actually works and the designer renders it fine, problem solved.... except you have an extra level of inheritance in your production application that was only necessary because of an inadequacy in the winforms designer!

This isn't a 100% surefire solution but its pretty good. Basically you use #if DEBUG to come up with the refined solution.

Refined Solution

Form1.cs

#if DEBUG
public class Form1 : MiddleClass
#else 
public class Form1 : BaseForm
#endif
...

MiddleClass.cs

public class MiddleClass : BaseForm
... 

BaseForm.cs

public abstract class BaseForm : Form
... 

What this does is only use the solution outlined in "initial solution", if it is in debug mode. The idea is that you will never release production mode via a debug build and that you will always design in debug mode.

The designer will always run against the code built in the current mode, so you cannot use the designer in release mode. However, as long as you design in debug mode and release the code built in release mode, you are good to go.

The only surefire solution would be if you can test for design mode via a preprocessor directive.

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2  
Do your form and the abstract base class have a no-arg constructor ? Cause that's all we had to add to get the designer working to show a form that inherited from an abstract form. –  nos Jul 29 '10 at 9:05
    
Worked great! I figure I'll just make the modifications I needed to to the various classes implementing the abstract one, then remove the temp middle class again, and if I ever need to make more modifications later, I can add it back. The workaround did, indeed, work. Thanks! –  neminem Feb 7 '11 at 17:37
    
Your solution works great. I just can't believe Visual Studio requires you to jump through such hoops to do something so common. –  RB Davidson Jan 17 '12 at 16:32
    
May I also suggest to wrap MiddleClass.cs on an #else –  Arvin Mar 8 '12 at 12:59
    
What is wrong with doing this instead #if DEBUG public class BaseForm : Form #else public abstract class BaseForm : Form #endif –  alexw Sep 6 '13 at 5:15
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@Smelch, thanks for the helpful answer, as I was running into the same issue recently.

Following is a minor change to your post to prevent compilation warnings (by putting the base class within the #if DEBUG pre-processor directive):

public class Form1
#if DEBUG  
 : MiddleClass 
#else  
 : BaseForm 
#endif 
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@smelch, There is a better solution, without having to create a middle control, even for debug.

What we want

First, let's define the final class and the base abstract class.

public class MyControl : AbstractControl
...
public abstract class AbstractControl : UserControl // Also works for Form
...

Now all we need is a Description provider.

public class AbstractControlDescriptionProvider<TAbstract, TBase> : TypeDescriptionProvider
{
    public AbstractControlDescriptionProvider()
        : base(TypeDescriptor.GetProvider(typeof(TAbstract)))
    {
    }

    public override Type GetReflectionType(Type objectType, object instance)
    {
        if (objectType == typeof(TAbstract))
            return typeof(TBase);

        return base.GetReflectionType(objectType, instance);
    }

    public override object CreateInstance(IServiceProvider provider, Type objectType, Type[] argTypes, object[] args)
    {
        if (objectType == typeof(TAbstract))
            objectType = typeof(TBase);

        return base.CreateInstance(provider, objectType, argTypes, args);
    }
}

Finally we just apply a TypeDescriptionProvider attribute to the Abastract control.

[TypeDescriptionProvider(typeof(AbstractControlDescriptionProvider<AbstractControl, UserControl>))]
public abstract class AbstractControl : UserControl
...

And that's it. No middle control required.

And the provider class can be applied to as many Abstract bases as we want in the same solution.

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This did not work for me. Visual Studio designer ended up complaining about properties that my particular AbstractControl class implemented but UserControl didn't. –  Stéphane Gourichon Aug 30 '13 at 20:08
    
This did also work for me that i am using CF 3.5 there is no TypeDescriptionProvider –  Adrian Botor Jan 24 at 9:26
    
You need to import System.ComponentModel. This worked great for me, thanks! –  Sukasa Feb 19 at 6:21
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I had a similar problem but found a way to refactor things to use an interface in place of an abstract base class:

interface Base {....}

public class MyUserControl<T> : UserControl, Base
     where T : /constraint/
{ ... }

This may not be applicable to every situation, but when possible it results in a cleaner solution than conditional compilation.

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I'm using the solution in this answer to another question, which links this article. The article recommends using a custom TypeDescriptionProvider and concrete implementation of the abstract class. The designer will ask the custom provider which types to use, and your code can return the concrete class so that the designer is happy while you have complete control over how the abstract class appears as a concrete class.

Update: I included a documented code sample in my answer to that other question. The code there does work, but sometimes I have to go through a clean/build cycle as noted in my answer to get it to work.

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The Windows Forms Designer is creating an instance of the base class of your form/control and applies the parse result of InitializeComponent. That's why you can design the form created by the project wizard without even building the project. Because of this behavior you also can not design a control derived from an abstract class.

You can implement those abstract methods and throw an exception when it is not running in the designer. The programmer who derive from the control must provide an implementation that does not call your base class implementation. Otherwise the program would crash.

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pity, but thats how it is done yet. Hoped of a correct way to do this. –  BeowulfOF Oct 25 '09 at 18:14
    
There is a better way, see Smelch's answer –  Allen Rice Mar 9 '10 at 3:43
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Since the abstract class public abstract class BaseForm: Form gives an error and avoid the use of the designer, I came with the use of virtual members. Basically, instead of declaring abstract methods, I declared virtual methods with the minimum body as possible. Here's what I've done :

public class DataForm : Form {
    protected virtual void displayFields() {}
}

public partial class Form1 : DataForm {
    protected override void displayFields() { /* Do the stuff needed for Form1. */ }
    ...
}

public partial class Form2 : DataForm {
    protected override void displayFields() { /* Do the stuff needed for Form2. */ }
    ...
}

/* Do this for all classes that inherit from DataForm. */

Since DataForm was supposed to be an abstract class with the abstract member displayFields, I "fake" this behavior with virtual members to avoid the abstraction. The designer doesn't complain anymore and everything works fine for me.

It's a workaround more readable, but since it's not abstract, I have to make sure that all child classes of DataForm have their implementation of displayFields. Thus, be careful when using this technique.

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You could just conditionally compile in the abstract keyword without interposing a separate class:

#if DEBUG
  // Visual Studio 2008 designer complains when a form inherits from an 
  // abstract base class
  public class BaseForm: Form {
#else
  // For production do it the *RIGHT* way.
  public abstract class BaseForm: Form {
#endif

    // Body of BaseForm goes here
  }

This works provided that BaseForm doesn't have any abstract methods (the abstract keyword therefore only prevents the runtime instantiation of the class).

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