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How can I use shell one-liners and common GNU tools to concatenate lines in two files as in Cartesian product? What is the most succinct, beautiful and "linuxy" way?

For example, if I have two files:

$ cat file1
a
b
$ cat file2
c
d
e

The result should be

a, c
a, d
a, e
b, c
b, d
b, e
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Oh no, it's turned into a competition ... –  C. Ross Oct 26 '09 at 20:31
    
@C. Ross , it didn't. I had a definite and expressed criterion of not using perl, python, etc. And the rest was only a usual battle for maintainability. simplicity and clarity. –  Pavel Shved Oct 26 '09 at 21:10

9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here's shell script to do it

while read a; do while read b; do echo "$a, $b"; done < file2; done < file1

Though that will be quite slow. I can't think of any precompiled logic to accomplish this. The next step for speed would be to do the above in awk/perl.

awk 'NR==FNR { a[$0]; next } { for (i in a) print i",", $0 }' file1 file2

Hmm, how about this hacky solution to use precompiled logic?

paste -d, <(sed -n "$(yes 'p;' | head -n $(wc -l < file2))" file1) \
          <(cat $(yes 'file2' | head -n $(wc -l < file1)))
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2  
@Pixelbeat: your first version needs to reverse the order of file1 and file2. (That is, it should be done < file2; done < file 1 to get the desired result. –  Telemachus Oct 25 '09 at 14:27
2  
@Telemachus , the order is irrelevant: if I say "Cartesian product", I really mean it. –  Pavel Shved Oct 26 '09 at 20:11

The mechanical way to do it in shell, not using Perl or Python, is:

while read line1
do
    while read line2
    do echo "$line1, $line2"
    done < file2
done < file1

The join command can sometimes be used for these operations - however, I'm not clear that it can do cartesian product as a degenerate case.

One step up from the double loop would be:

while read line1
do
    sed "s/^/$line1, /" file2
done < file1
share|improve this answer
    
I'd go for the first solution because it doesn't make the files look like they're substantially different. –  Pavel Shved Oct 26 '09 at 20:20
    
It (the first solution) would likely be substantially slower - but it would also be immune to odd characters (such as slashes) in the data. Fixing things so that is not a problem is a bit fiddlier, and at that point you start thinking about using Perl or Python after all. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 26 '09 at 20:58
    
@Pavel - thanks for the editorial assist. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 27 '09 at 1:49

Edit:

DVK's attempt inspired me to do this with eval:

script='1{x;d};${H;x;s/\n/\,/g;p;q};H'
eval "echo {$(sed -n $script file1)}\,\ {$(sed -n $script file2)}$'\n'"|sed 's/^ //'

Or a simpler sed script:

script=':a;N;${s/\n/,/g;b};ba'

which you would use without the -n switch.

which gives:

a, c
a, d
a, e
b, c
b, d
b, e

Original answer:

In Bash, you can do this. It doesn't read from files, but it's a neat trick:

$ echo {a,b}\,\ {c,d,e}$'\n'
a, c
 a, d
 a, e
 b, c
 b, d
 b, e

More simply:

$ echo {a,b}{c,d,e}
ac ad ae bc bd be
share|improve this answer
    
nice. but i sure would not want to maintain this script. :) –  ghostdog74 Oct 25 '09 at 23:49
    
Truly delightful, but unmaintainable. :) –  Pavel Shved Oct 26 '09 at 20:18

Edit: Oops... Sorry, I thought this was tagged python...

If you have python 2.6:

from itertools import product
print('\n'.join((', '.join(elt) for elt in (product(*((line.strip() for line in fh) for fh in (open('file1','r'), open('file2','r'))))))))

a, c
a, d
a, e
b, c
b, d
b, e

If you have python pre-2.6:

def product(*args, **kwds):
    '''
    Source: http://docs.python.org/library/itertools.html#itertools.product
    '''
    # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy
    # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
    pools = map(tuple, args) * kwds.get('repeat', 1)
    result = [[]]
    for pool in pools:
        result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool]
    for prod in result:
        yield tuple(prod)
print('\n'.join((', '.join(elt) for elt in (product(*((line.strip() for line in fh) for fh in (open('file1','r'), open('file2','r'))))))))
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That would work, but python is not what I've been asking for. –  Pavel Shved Oct 25 '09 at 13:52

Solution 1:

perl -e '{use File::Slurp; @f1 = read_file("file1"); @f2 = read_file("file2"); map { chomp; $v1 = $_; map { print "$v1,$_"; } @f2 } @f1;}'

share|improve this answer
    
Why did you use map here? Those should be for loops. –  user181548 Oct 25 '09 at 14:05
    
@Kinopiko: Weren't you just complaining about "language police" on a different thread? –  Telemachus Oct 25 '09 at 14:24
    
The only thing I like to use more than maps is Regular Expressions. :) –  DVK Oct 25 '09 at 16:09
    
@Telemachus: If you can't beat them, join them. –  user181548 Oct 26 '09 at 4:01
    
Language Police is right here: Language Cops are coming and busting you! :-) –  Pavel Shved Oct 26 '09 at 20:16
awk 'FNR==NR{ a[++d]=$1; next}
{
  for ( i=1;i<=d;i++){
    print $1","a[i]
  }
}' file2 file1

# ./shell.sh
a,c
a,d
a,e
b,c
b,d
b,e
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OK, this is derivation of Dennis Williamson's solution above since he noted that his does not read from file:

$ echo {`cat a | tr "\012" ","`}\,\ {`cat b | tr "\012" ","`}$'\n'
a, c
 a, d
 a, e
 b, c
 b, d
 b, e
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1  
This is what that gives me: {a,b,}, {c,d,e,} as a literal string. –  Dennis Williamson Oct 25 '09 at 20:17

A solution using join, awk and process substitution:

join <(xargs -I_ echo 1 _ < setA) <(xargs -I_ echo 1 _ < setB)
  | awk '{ printf("%s, %s\n", $2, $3) }'
share|improve this answer
    
What is the contents of the file "a"? Should one of them be a different file? The AWK could probably be replaced by cut -f2- -d' '. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 31 '10 at 19:20
    
The "a" file contains the set. They may be different if wanted. I'll correct it! –  yassin Jul 31 '10 at 19:36
    
@Dennis, cut is probably better, since it works even if setB contains lines with whitespaces. –  Pavel Shved Aug 1 '10 at 6:12

I'm not going to pretend this is pretty, but...

join -t, -j 9999 /tmp/file1 /tmp/file2 | cut -c2-

--- caveat, ymmv join (GNU coreutils) 8.4

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