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I am trying to open and read 4 MB bin file, but I couldn't use fread to read more than ~700 KB. Actually I want to open and read genesis ROM file which is binary format that reading should be from beginning to the last byte. When trying to read over that amount, error occurs at run time, program stops and closes.

My code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main ()
{
    FILE* fp;
    int buffer[4000000];
    fp=fopen ("file.bin","rb");
    fread (buffer,sizeof(int),4000000,fp);
}

What is the wrong with my code?

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4  
You do know that the average stack size if somewhere between 1 and 4 megabytes? You have a stack of almost 16 megabytes. I'm surprised your program even loads. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 25 '13 at 8:15
    
i'm totally new in C programming , if its possible to show me how to done the mission please.. –  Saeed Basrah Apr 25 '13 at 8:19
2  
Then here's a couple of other helpful hints (unrelated to your problem here, but still good): In C never have an empty argument list when declaring a function. That means the function takes an unspecified number of unspecified arguments. And when used for main it's actually not valid as per the specification. If you want a function without argument used void, as in int main(void) .... You also declare main to return an int (which is correct), but you don't actually return anything. You either need to call exit or return a value (zero means no error). –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 25 '13 at 8:24
    
Also, you say that the files you want to read are 4 MB? Remember that an int is 4 bytes, so you only need a little bit over one million of them for 4MB. There may also be problems with endianness, so you should probably have an array of little over 4 million bytes, something like uint8_t buffer[4 * 1024 * 1024]; –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 25 '13 at 8:28
    
@SaeedBasrah I would suggest that the negative vote you're complaining about in the answer Alex gave is due to lack of research. Which research have you done prior to asking this question? Did you read the fread manual? Having done so, don't you think the return value of fread is rather important? Why doesn't your code use it? –  undefined behaviour Apr 25 '13 at 9:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The better choice is load file my blocks.

Also in order not to run out the stack, you should use dynamically allocated buffer, as heap is bigger than stack.

#define BLOCK_SIZE 4096

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int read_file(FILE* file, unsigned char* buffer);

int main ()
{
     FILE* fp;
     unsigned char* buffer = NULL;
     int bytes_read = 0;
     fp=fopen ("file.bin","rb");
     bytes_read = read_file(fp, buffer);
     return 0;
}

int read_file(FILE* file, unsigned char* buffer)
{
    int bytes_read = 0;
    int block_bytes_read = 0;
    unsigned char block[BLOCK_SIZE];

    do
    {
         block_bytes_read = fread (block,sizeof(char),BLOCK,file);
         buffer = realloc(buffer, block_bytes_read*sizeof(char));
         memcpy((buffer + bytes_read), block, block_bytes_read*sizeof(char));
         bytes_read += block_bytes_read;
    } while (block_bytes_read != 0);

   return bytes_read;

}
share|improve this answer
    
little example may solve the problem ,, how to make dynamically allocated buffer –  Saeed Basrah Apr 25 '13 at 8:34
    
@SaeedBasrah try this –  Alex Apr 25 '13 at 8:51
    
thank you Alex i signed your answer –  Saeed Basrah Apr 25 '13 at 8:57
    
@SaeedBasrah You changed your mind? –  Alex Apr 25 '13 at 9:01
    
thank you Alex ,i will give it a try then back may be at two or three days to be honest , allso thank for all other mambers answered and gives advices , and i beleave all answers are nice ,,,, some one gave my Question -1 ????!!! i didnt say that i'm proffisional i admit that I totally new with C ,, and thats the correct place to ask !! or i'm wrong ?! –  Saeed Basrah Apr 25 '13 at 9:06

Please do the read operation in a loop for a particular chunk size.

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Make buffer a static variable, so it will not reside on the stack.

In addition, use fread inside a loop, since it is not guaraneed to read all the file at once.

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Make buffer a static variable, so it will not reside on the stack?? thats will be great but really i'm new in C . –  Saeed Basrah Apr 25 '13 at 8:35
    
Just put the keyword static before int buffer[4000000];. That's not the best solutions - other have given you better ones. that's just the quickest. –  Elazar Apr 25 '13 at 8:39
    
Is there any proof to suggest that an object declared with static storage duration can't lie on a stack? –  undefined behaviour Apr 25 '13 at 9:48
    
it can't lie on the stack because it's address must be absolute. technically I think it can be put in the bottom of the stack just like any global variable, but no sane compiler will do it. –  Elazar Apr 25 '13 at 9:51
    
There are no global variables in C. You appear to be misusing statistics. –  undefined behaviour Apr 25 '13 at 9:53

[1] missing return (return negative to indicate error occurred)

[2] use malloc (dynamically allocate off heap) instead of stack

[3] check pointer values for file read, memory allocation & number of bytes read

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main ()
{
    FILE * pFile;
    char * buffer;
    size_t size = 4194304;
    size_t result;

    pFile = fopen ( "file.bin" , "rb" );
    if (pFile==NULL) {
       fputs ("Unable to open file",stderr); 
       return (-1);
    }

    buffer = (char*) malloc (sizeof(char)*size);
    if (buffer == NULL) {
        fputs ("Unable to allocate memory",stderr); 
        return (-2);
    }

    result = fread (buffer,1,size,pFile);
    if (result != size) {
       fputs ("Unable to read 4 MB",stderr); 
       return (-3);
    }

    fclose (pFile);
    free (buffer);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no need for the parenthesis in the return statements. sizeof(char) is also unnecessary, as it is always 1, though arguably helps readability. +1, anyway. –  Elazar Apr 25 '13 at 8:51

My biggest problem with this code is in this line:

fread (buffer,sizeof(int),4000000,fp);

This line introduces a significant list of problems, actually. Firstly, there is no guarantee that the file you're reading from was successfully opened. You need to compare fp to NULL to make that guarantee, as others have indicated. Secondly, and it seems I'm stressing this way too often: You really should be checking the return value. This goes for all standard C functions, not just fopen and fread.

The return value of fread tells you how many items were actually read. Suppose you're requesting four million ints, and the file only contains two. The return value will tell you that only two ints were read.


Now, onto the big stuff! Let us first consider that sizeof(int) differs on different implementations. Your system might read four bytes, while another might read two and another yet might read eight. This is just a basic, yet fundamental way in which integer representation might differ.

Let us consider a more subtle, yet equally devastating way integer representation might differ: Suppose your ints are four bytes, with the left-most bit being the least significant bit. Another machine might use the left-most bit as the least significant bit. Likewise, consider endianness, which is the order of bytes.

Suppose your ints are thirty-two bits, and they represent values between -(1 << 31) and (1 << 31), which implies that there are no padding bits. Another system might use thirty-two bit integers that have sixteen bits of padding, which means it might only represent values between -(1 << 16) and (1 << 16). Suppose those padding bits are parity bits, to ensure that RAM is functioning correctly (eg. Intel Xeon servers). Now you have a situation where your server is telling you your RAM is faulty, when it isn't.

Your code should explicitly translate from the integer representation your files use to store integers, to whichever representation your computer uses natively. When writing your integers to the file, you need to ensure that you explicitly translate your implementations representation into that representation. Likewise, when reading your integers back from the file, your code should explicitly translate that representation into your implementations representation.

For example, let us assume that your int values won't lie beyond -32767 or 32767 (16 bit signed integer, ones' complement). It would be portable to represent this using two bytes, but you need to define the sign and representation of that integer explicitly. When writing, you could extract the sign and the absolute value, then write sign * 128 + absolute_value / 256 and absolute_value % 256 to your file. When reading, you'd then extract the sign bit, multiply and add to reconstruct your value.


Let us consider that your file is supposedly 4MB, yet you are reading sizeof (int) * 4000000 values. 4MB is 0x400000, not sizeof (int) * 4000000. I suppose what you really want would be something along the lines of:

unsigned char *foo = malloc(0x400000); /* 4MB */

/* XXX: Handle malloc errors here */
assert(foo != NULL);

FILE *fp = fopen("file.bin", "rb");

/* XXX: Handle fopen errors here */
assert(fp != NULL);

size_t num_bytes_read = fread(foo, 1, 0x400000, fp);

/* XXX: Transform the bytes into integers */

free(foo);

My problem with this is that it relies upon a 4MB buffer just to read and transform bytes into integers. This task doesn't need a buffer at all!

FILE *fp = fopen("file.bin", "rb");

/* XXX: Handle fopen errors here */
assert(fp != NULL);

for (;;) {
    int x = fgetc(fp);

    /* XXX: Handle fgetc errors here */
    assert(x >= 0);

    int y = fgetc(fp);

    /* XXX: Handle fgetc errors here */
    assert(y >= 0);

    /* XXX: Transform the characters in x and y into the int values */
};

free(foo);

Whether or not you need to store those transformed values somewhere isn't specified in the question. If you don't need to, then my next problem is the use of an array, when you could just be reading a single item, processing it and then moving onto the next.

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thats also nice explanation and helpful thanx ,,, the problem is that i am just really beginner in C programming . –  Saeed Basrah Apr 25 '13 at 9:35

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