Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

What is wrong with the following code?

class A:
    def A_M(self): pass
    class B:
        @staticmethod
        def C(): super(B).A_M()

error (Python 2.7.3):

>>> a = A()
>>> a.B.C()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "..x.py", line 36, in C
    def C(): super(B).A_M()
NameError: global name 'B' is not defined

Edit:
the solution was simple as this:

class A:
    def A_M(self): pass
    class B:
        @staticmethod
        def C(): A().A_M()                 #use of A() instead of supper, etc.

Important Note that there is an issue with this solution. If you change the name of super class (i.e. A) then you will have to update all uses inside itself as A :)).

share|improve this question
    
Why do you think you want a nested class? There is almost zero reason to ever have this in Python. –  Daniel Roseman Apr 25 '13 at 8:52
    
" If you change the name of super class (i.e. A) then you will have to update all uses inside itself as A" - That's not what super class means –  Eric Apr 25 '13 at 21:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
class A(object):
    def foo(self):
        print('foo')

    @staticmethod
    def bar():
        print('bar')

    class B(object):
        @staticmethod
        def bar(obj):
            # A.foo is not staticmethod, you can't use A.foo(),
            # you need an instance.
            # You also can't use super here to get A,
            # because B is not subclass of A.
            obj.foo()
            A.foo(obj)  # the same as obj.foo()

            # A.bar is static, you can use it without an object.
            A.bar()

class B(A):
    def foo(self):
        # Again, B.foo shouldn't be a staticmethod, because A.foo isn't.
        super(B, self).foo()

    @staticmethod
    def bar():
        # You have to use super(type, type) if you don't have an instance.
        super(B, B).bar()


a, b = A(), B()

a.B.bar(a)
b.foo()
B.bar()

See this for details on super(B, B).

share|improve this answer
    
the solution is therefore: class A: def A_M(self): pass class B: @staticmethod def C(): A().A_M() –  Developer Apr 25 '13 at 10:22

You need to use a fully-qualified name. Also, in python 2.7, you need to use (object), else super(A.B) will give TypeError: must be type, not classobj

class A(object):
    def A_M(self):
        pass

    class B(object):
        @staticmethod
        def C():
            super(A.B).A_M()

Finally, super(A.B) is essentially object here. Did you mean for B to inherit from A? Or were you simply looking for A.A_M()?

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't work: ...error: def C(): super(A.B).A_M() TypeError: must be type, not classobj –  Developer Apr 25 '13 at 8:44
    
@Developer: Ok, now read my post again: "Also, in python 2.7, you need to use (object)". super only works on new-style classes –  Eric Apr 25 '13 at 8:45
    
still doesn't work: ...err: super(A.B).A_M() AttributeError: 'super' object has no attribute 'A_M' –  Developer Apr 25 '13 at 8:50
    
@Developer: Keep reading - "super(A.B) is essentially object here". And object.A_M() doesn't exist. "Did you mean for B to inherit from A? Or were you simply looking for A.A_M()?" –  Eric Apr 25 '13 at 8:56
    
Even if it was inherited, it still don't think it would work because it's static –  GP89 Apr 25 '13 at 9:01

A latecommer, to just encapsulate B in A the easy way is this:

class A:
    def A_M(self):
        return "hi"

    class B:
        @staticmethod
        def C():
            return A().A_M()

a = A()
print a.B().C()

Not sure this is what you need, but the question was still unsolved, so I guessed.

share|improve this answer
    
a.B().C() is not correct. a.B.C() is correct (because C is static in B). I voted up your answer, BTW. gatto's answer says the same thing but a little lengthy. –  Developer Apr 25 '13 at 10:27
    
@Developer : Well, the way it works now does not allow you to change any variables in the current instance of A, trough B. you would need to pass the current instance of A() to B() to change anything in A() EG: pastebin.com/2Cxh16fG –  JHolta Apr 25 '13 at 10:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.