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Im creating a simple python program that gives basic functionality of an SMS_Inbox. I have created an SMS_Inbox method.

store = []
message_count = 0
class sms_store:
    def add_new_arrival(self,number,time,text):
        store.append(("From: "+number, "Recieved: "+time,"Msg: "+text))
        **message_count += 1**
    def delete(self,i):
        if i > len(store-1):
            print("Index does not exist")
        else:
            del store[i]
            message_count -= 1

In the bolded bit I am getting an error:

UnboundLocalError: local variable 'message_count' referenced before assignment.

I created a global variable store which is an empty list and this works when I use the add_new_variable object. However for some reason it is not adding values to my global message_count variable.

Please help

share|improve this question
2  
None of your variables are called count... –  Eric Apr 25 '13 at 8:48
    
Did you mean message_count? –  Sukrit Kalra Apr 25 '13 at 8:49
    
Meant to quote: UnboundLocalError: local variable 'message_count' referenced before assignment –  user2318861 Apr 25 '13 at 8:50
    
Its simple. In each function that you are using message_count, just add global message_count as the first statement. Needless to say, this approach on the whole should not be used at all. Use a class variable if you absolutely must. –  spicavigo Apr 25 '13 at 9:01
1  
Have to ask, why do you have message_count, when you can just do len(store)? –  Burhan Khalid Apr 25 '13 at 9:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That's not how classes work. Data should be stored within the class instance, not globally.

class SMSStore(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.store = []
        self.message_count = 0

    def add_new_arrival(self,number,time,text):
        self.store.append(("From: "+number, "Recieved: "+time,"Msg: "+text))
        self.message_count += 1

    def delete(self, i):
        if i >= len(store):
            raise IndexError
        else:
            del self.store[i]
            self.message_count -= 1

sms_store = SMSStore()
sms_store.add_new_arrival("1234", "now", "lorem ipsum")
try:
    sms_store.delete(20)
except IndexError:
    print("Index does not exist")

print sms_store.store

# multiple separate stores
sms_store2 = SMSStore()
sms_store2.add_new_arrival("4321", "then", "lorem ipsum")
print sms_store2.store
share|improve this answer
    
If it is in the class instance, will it maintain the list items? –  user2318861 Apr 25 '13 at 8:52
    
@user2318861: Yes, that is the point. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 8:53
    
thanks eric!!!! –  user2318861 Apr 25 '13 at 9:02
    
@eric the instance of self.store and self.message_count is not recording / saving values like i wanted and aimed for. Its just recording the instances of a add_new_arrival and not recording it in a list for further editing and adding.. such as a global variable would. So would I have to go with the global variable approach by creating the store list and message count outside the class and refer to it as a global variable in the class instance? –  user2318861 Apr 25 '13 at 9:30
1  
Then only create one store. –  Eric Apr 25 '13 at 9:45

If the variable you are referring to is message_count, the error is because in Python, you have to specify a variable as global before you can make edits with it.

This should work.

store = []
message_count = 0
class sms_store:
    def add_new_arrival(self,number,time,text):
        global message_count
        store.append(("From: "+number, "Recieved: "+time,"Msg: "+text))
        message_count += 1
    def delete(self,i):
        if i > len(store-1):
            print("Index does not exist")
        else:
            global message_count
            del store[i]
            message_count -= 1

As written above, you'd be better off encapsulating it in the __init__ function instead of declaring it global.

share|improve this answer

You are trying to assign to a global variable message_count without declaring it as such:

message_count = 0

class sms_store:
    def add_new_arrival(self,number,time,text):
        store.append(("From: "+number, "Recieved: "+time,"Msg: "+text))
        global message_count
        message_count += 1

Try to avoid using globals, or at least encapsulate the variable as a class attribute:

class sms_store:
    message_count = 0
    store = []

    def add_new_arrival(self,number,time,text):
        sms_store.append(("From: "+number, "Recieved: "+time,"Msg: "+text))
        sms_store.message_count += 1

However, your class instances have no state anymore, so there is no point in creating a class here. It only serves to confuse your purpose.

Either store state in instances, or use global functions (so don't use a class at all); the former is preferable to the latter.

Transforming your setup to a class whose instances hold state, using proper PEP-8 styleguide naming and string formatting:

class SMSStore(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.store = []
        self.message_count = 0

    def add_new_arrival(self, number, time, text):
        self.store.append('From: {}, Received: {}, Msg: {}'.format(number, time, text))
        self.message_count += 1

You are then free to create one instance and use that as a global if needs be:

sms_store = SMSStore()

Other code just uses sms_store.add_new_arrival(...), but the state is encapsulated in one instance.

share|improve this answer
    
...and don't ever do that. –  7stud Apr 25 '13 at 8:52
    
@7stud: depends on what the count should represent.. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 8:52
    
Hard to work out what meaning self holds here... –  Eric Apr 25 '13 at 8:53
1  
@Eric: Yeah, the OP probably didn't want to use global state at all, or should not use a class. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 8:54
    
I did want to use global state. Why? I want to keep a record of all messages in the inbox. Hence I adjust message_count accordingly dependant on object calls to add_new_arrival or delete. –  user2318861 Apr 25 '13 at 8:57

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