Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is possible to capture event when user tries to close floating toolbar window in swing? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's probably some really awesomely simple solution, but why would you use that?

The best I could come up with (without extending out my own tool bar) was to add an AncestorListener to the toolbar and monitor it's events.

The problem I have this approach, though, is you need to know the main frame you were originally attached to, which may not be convenient.

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.event.ComponentEvent;
import java.awt.event.ComponentListener;
import java.awt.event.ContainerEvent;
import java.awt.event.ContainerListener;
import java.awt.event.HierarchyEvent;
import java.awt.event.HierarchyListener;
import java.beans.PropertyChangeEvent;
import java.beans.PropertyChangeListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JToolBar;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;
import javax.swing.event.AncestorEvent;
import javax.swing.event.AncestorListener;

public class TestFloatingToolBar {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestFloatingToolBar();
    }

    public TestFloatingToolBar() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                final JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");

                final JToolBar tb = new JToolBar();
                tb.add(new JButton("Pop"));
                tb.setFloatable(true);

                tb.addAncestorListener(new AncestorListener() {
                    @Override
                    public void ancestorAdded(AncestorEvent event) {
                        tell();
                        if (SwingUtilities.getWindowAncestor(tb).equals(frame)) {
                            System.out.println("...In Main Frame");
                        } else {
                            System.out.println("...Maybe floating");
                        }
                    }

                    @Override
                    public void ancestorRemoved(AncestorEvent event) {
                        tell();
                        if (SwingUtilities.getWindowAncestor(tb).equals(frame)) {
                            System.out.println("...In Main Frame");
                        } else {
                            System.out.println("...Maybe floating");
                        }
                    }

                    @Override
                    public void ancestorMoved(AncestorEvent event) {
                    }
                });

                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
                frame.add(tb, BorderLayout.NORTH);
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }

        });
    }

    public void tell() {
        Exception exp = new Exception();
        StackTraceElement[] stackTrace = exp.getStackTrace();
        System.out.println(stackTrace[1].getMethodName());
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 or Component/HierarchyListener for example –  mKorbel Apr 25 '13 at 9:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.