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Based on this HTML:

<li><strong><a href="http://www.ukasta.org.uk/">United Kingdom Agricultural Supply Trade Association</a> (UKASTA)</strong></li>

I want to get the United Kingdom Agricultural Supply TradeAssociation and (UKASTA) strings.

Using Nokogiri, I wrote:

linklist=link.parent.parent.css('li strong a')
linklist.each do |f|
  puts f.text
end

f.text is "United Kingdom Agricultural Supply TradeAssociation", but how do I get "(UKASTA)"?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're diving in too deep. I'd use:

require 'nokogiri'

html = '<li><strong><a href="http://www.ukasta.org.uk/">United Kingdom Agricultural Supply Trade Association</a> (UKASTA)</strong></li>'
doc = Nokogiri::HTML(html)
doc.at('strong').text

Which returns:

"United Kingdom Agricultural Supply Trade Association (UKASTA)"

If you have to find the <a> node, you can access "(UKASTA)" using:

a_node = doc.at('a')
a_node.text
=> "United Kingdom Agricultural Supply Trade Association"
a_node.next_sibling.text
=> " (UKASTA)"
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You could use the children method, and then identify the data by position:

require 'nokogiri'

html_doc = Nokogiri::HTML("<html><li><strong><a href="">United Kingdom Agricultural Supply Trade Association</a>(UKASTA)</strong></li></html>")

html_doc.css('li strong').children[0].text
=> United Kingdom Agricultural Supply Trade Association
html_doc.css('li strong').children[1]
=> (UKASTA)
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Note that if you want it combined as a single string, you can also do html_doc.css('li strong').text to get United Kingdom Agricultural Supply Trade Association (UKASTA) –  Justin Ko Apr 25 '13 at 18:52
    
.css('li strong').children[0] is an awkward way to get to the node you want. css returns a NodeSet, which is akin to an Array. Then you're saying children, which would be another array, then [0] to get the first element. Instead, use at instead of css. It returns the first occurrence of the accessor as a Node, so it short-circuits .css('li strong').children[0] nicely. –  the Tin Man Apr 26 '13 at 0:56
    
Thx, Tin Man. Always good to learn a cleaner/shorter way... –  orde Apr 26 '13 at 16:15
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