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Consider the example code below (I typed it up quickly as an example, if there are errors it doesn't matter - I'm interested in the theory).

bool shutDown = false; //global

int main()
{
  CreateThread(NULL, 0, &MessengerLoop, NULL, 0, NULL);
  //do other programmy stuff...
}


DWORD WINAPI MessengerLoop( LPVOID lpParam )
{
  zmq::context_t context(1);
  zmq::socket_t socket (context, ZMQ_SUB);
  socket.connect("tcp://localhost:5556");
  socket.setsockopt(ZMQ_SUBSCRIBE, "10001 ", 6);

  while(!shutDown)
  {
    zmq_msg_t getMessage;
    zmq_msg_init(&getMessage);
    zmq_msg_recv (&getMessage, socket, 0); //This line will wait forever for a message
    processMessage(getMessage); 
  }
}

A thread is created to wait for incoming messages and to handle them appropriately. The thread is looping until shutDown is set to true.

In ZeroMQ the Guide specifically states what must be cleaned up, namely the messages, socket and context.

My issue is: Since recv will wait forever for a message, blocking the thread, how can I shut down this thread safely if a message is never received?

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Use the ZMQ_DONTWAIT flag in zmq_msg_recv, and add a manual Sleep for a short time period? So use a more polling method? –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 25 '13 at 10:39
    
I don't know about zmg_* API, but in plain socket API it is enough to close the socket in another thread, and recv exits with failure. To do this, you need to connect to the socket in another thread, to have socket variable available for closing. MessengerLoop must contain only endless recv loop. –  0123456789 Apr 25 '13 at 11:41
    
@AlexFarber I had considered that but, unless I'm mistaken, wouldn't that result in all of the message processing being done in that same MessengerLoop thread? In which case I then have to setup some sort of signalling system to differentiate between "I'm waiting for a message, so yes you can terminate me" and "I'm busy processing something, don't terminate me yet". This seems messier than a Polling based system. I'm pretty new to this network messaging malarky, am I missing something or is that the normal way to do things? –  Ian Apr 25 '13 at 12:22
    
I am not familiar with zmq_* functions, but looking at the code you posted, I think the only line that can fail in the loop, when the socket is closed, is zmq_msg_recv call. But this is just my guess. Once this call fails, exit the loop and the whole thread. –  0123456789 Apr 25 '13 at 12:28
    
Also, after closing the socket from the main thread, you need to wait for the thread handle, when the thread actually exits - general Win32 multithreading programming rules. –  0123456789 Apr 25 '13 at 12:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The blocking call will exit in a few ways. First, and this depends on your language and binding, an interrupt (Ctrl-C, SIGINT, SIGTERM) will exit the call. You'll get back (again, depending on your binding) an error or a null message (libzmq returns an EINTR error).

Second, if you terminate the context in another thread, the blocking call will also exit (libzmq returns an ETERM error).

Thirdly, you can set timeouts on the socket so it will return in any case after some timeout, if there's no data. We don't often do this but it can be useful in some cases.

Finally, what we do in practice is never do blocking receives but use zmq_poll to find out when sockets have messages waiting, then receive from those sockets. This is how you scale out to handling more sockets.

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would you still use polling for REQ - REP pairs? –  Ian Apr 25 '13 at 13:02
    
Sure. Blocking reads are fine in simple tasks that work with exactly one socket, but most realistic tasks use multiple sockets. You might for instance use a REQ socket to receive work, and then also log your status to a PUB socket every few minutes. –  Pieter Hintjens Apr 25 '13 at 18:18
    
that's exactly what I've implemented :) Good to know I'm on the right track. Thanks! –  Ian Apr 26 '13 at 8:37

You can use non-blocking call flag ZMQ_DONTWAIT

  while(!shutDown)
  {
    zmq_msg_t getMessage;
    zmq_msg_init(&getMessage);
    while(-1 == zmq_msg_recv(&getMessage, socket, ZMQ_DONTWAIT))
    {
      if (EAGAIN != errno || shutDown)
      {
        break;
      }
      Sleep(100);
    }
    processMessage(getMessage); 
  }
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