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I am trying to write an expect script which would ssh into a server, send sudo su, then check the iptables status and put the output in a log file on the server. Below is the script.

1 #!/usr/bin/expect
  2 exp_internal 1
  3 log_user 0
  4 set timeout 10
  5 set password  "******"
  6 
  7 spawn /usr/bin/ssh -l subhasish *.*.*.* -p 10022
  8 
  9 expect {
 10      -re "password: " {send "$password\r"}
 11      -re "$ "  {send "sudo su\r"}
 12      -re "[sudo] password for subhasish:" {send "$password\r"}
 13      -re "# "  {send "service iptables status\r"}
 14        }
 15 set output $expect_out(buffer)
 16 send "exit\r"
 17 puts "$output\r\n" >> output.log

But while run in debug mode, I am getting error like this;

expect -d testcase
expect version 5.44.1.15
argv[0] = expect  argv[1] = -d  argv[2] = testcase  
set argc 0
set argv0 "testcase"
set argv ""
executing commands from command file testcase
parent: waiting for sync byte
parent: telling child to go ahead
parent: now unsynchronized from child
spawn: returns {24105}
invalid command name "sudo"
    while executing
"sudo"
    invoked from within
"expect {
     -re "password: " {send "$password\r"}
     -re "$ "  {send "sudo su\r"}
     -re "[sudo] password for subhasish:" {send "$password\r"}
 ..."
    (file "testcase" line 9)

Not sure where I am going wrong. It says invalid command name "sudo", I guess this is because expect doesn;t understand these command. How to go around it. Please help. Thanks.

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2 Answers

The problem is in this line

-re "[sudo] password for subhasish:" {send "$password\r"}

In Tcl (and hence in expect) the square brackets are the syntax for command substitution (like backticks in the shell). So you either need to escape the brackets or use different quotes that prevent various expansions:

-re {[sudo] password for subhasish:} {send "$password\r"}

That brings up a different issue: are you expecting to see these exact characters? Because you're instructing expect to treat that as a regular expression, and square brackets in a regular expression means a character class, so it will match a single character, either a 's', 'u', 'd' or 'o'. So what you probably need is this:

-re {\[sudo\] password for subhasish:} {send "$password\r"}

or

-ex {[sudo] password for subhasish:} {send "$password\r"}
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I have changed the sudo su expect to "password for subhasish:" and also how you mentioned, neither case it's working; using updated below code, #!/usr/bin/expect -f #! /bin/bash set timeout 60 log_user 1 set host ..*.* set password ****** set user subhasish set logfile output.txt spawn ssh -p 10022 $user@$host expect "?assword:" send -- "$password\r" log_user 1 expect "$" send -- "sudo su\r" expect "password for subhasish:" send -- "$password\r" expect "#" send -- "service iptables status\r" log_file /home/subhasish/output.log expect "#" log_file send -- "exit\r"; send -- "exit\r"; exit 0 –  Subhasish Chatterjee Apr 29 '13 at 13:04
    
the manual logging looks like this, [root@localhost subhasish]# ssh -p 10022 subhasish@*.*.*.* subhasish@*.*.*.*'s password: Last login: Mon Apr 29 07:19:52 2013 from ..*.* [subhasish@testhost ~]$ sudo su [sudo] password for subhasish: [root@testhost subhasish]# –  Subhasish Chatterjee Apr 29 '13 at 13:09
    
debug script shows its getting stuck in expect: expect: does "\r\nLast login: Mon Apr 29 07:35:36 2013 from ..*.*\r\r\n\u001b]0;subhasish@testhost:~\u0007" (spawn_id exp4) match glob pattern "password for subhasish:"? no [subhasish@testhost ~]$ expect: does "\r\nLast login: Mon Apr 29 07:35:36 2013 from ..*.*\r\r\n\u001b]0;subhasish@testhost:~\u0007\u001b[?1034h[subhasish@testhost ~]$ " (spawn_id exp4) match glob pattern "password for subhasish:"? no –  Subhasish Chatterjee Apr 29 '13 at 13:13
    
Glob patterns need to match the entire string, so you need leading and trailing wildcards: expect -gl {*password for subhasish:*}., Also, those strings won't match since the words "password for" do not appear. –  glenn jackman Apr 29 '13 at 14:14
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Thanks Glenn, it's working now. One more reason why it was not working was it requires to sleep between normal login and sudo login, otherwise "sudo su" were being sent before the $ prompt returned, for reference to others, here is the code,

#!/usr/bin/expect -f
#! /bin/bash

set timeout 60
log_user 1
set host *.*.*.*
set password ****** 
set user subhasish
set logfile output.txt
spawn ssh -p 10022 $user@$host
expect "*?assword:*"
send -- "$password\r"
#log_user 1
sleep 2
expect "$"
send -- "sudo su\r"
expect -gl {*password for subhasish:*}
send -- "$password\r"
expect "#"
send -- "service iptables status\r"
log_file /home/subhasish/output.log
expect "#"
log_file
send -- "exit\r";
send -- "exit\r";
exit 0
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