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I m trying to replace " with \" in my string. I am using

java.util.regex.Pattern.compile("\\\"").matcher(myString).replaceAll("\\\\\"")

It works fine with my development machine as I m using newer version of JAVA. On the test machine it throws NoClassDefFounError .The test machine which closely resemble the production environment has an older version of JAVA. I am not sure which version it is.

I also tried with,

myString.replaceAll("\\\"","\\\\\"");

It throws NoSuchMethod Exception. Also it is same problem with

myString.matches()

Can someone help me out with the ways to work with regular expression in older JAVA versions?

Thanks in advance..

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2  
It is possible that the environment is older than Java 1.4, when java.util.regex package is first introduced. –  nhahtdh Apr 25 '13 at 11:02
    
Yes.It is definitely older than that –  Vinay thallam Apr 25 '13 at 11:03
    
Of course, you should use the productive JVM also for development, as you will run into these things lots of times. There had been many API additions in 1.4... –  Lukas Eder Apr 25 '13 at 11:05
1  
You should push them to update to a newer environment. Java 1.4 is more than 10 years ago already and if the environment is even older than that, it is way outdated: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  nhahtdh Apr 25 '13 at 11:05
2  
I would not take an old regex library from then. In fact only after 1.4 regex became such a pervasive success in Java. Mind also the non-regex replace("\"", "\\\"") is from later date. So you have to code (=think). So sorry. –  Joop Eggen Apr 25 '13 at 11:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the symptoms in the question, it is likely that you are running on a JVM that is older than version 1.4, which is when java.util.regex package is introduced. I think you could try to push them to upgrade the system, since version 1.4 is first released 11 years ago in 2002.

For now, you can work around with String.indexOf and StringBuffer1. This is not very pretty, but sufficient for fixed string searching and replacement2.

If you insist on regex, JRegex library is worth trying. The site claims that it works on any version of Java, and the regex features that it supports is quite rich.

Footnote

1 StringBuilder is only available from Java 1.5

2 String.replace(CharSequence target, CharSequence replacement), which replace a fixed string with another fixed string, is only available from Java 1.5.

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Here, answering my own question.

Implemented following simple code to effectively escape double quotes (i.e to replace " with \") and also ignores the quotes that are already escaped.

int index = myString.indexOf('"');

while(index != -1){     
    if(index == 0 || myString.charAt(index-1) != '\\'){
        myString= myString.substring(0,index)+"\\\""+myString.substring(index+1);  //Escaping the double quote if any in the string
        index = myString.indexOf('"', index+2);
    }
    else{
        index = myString.indexOf('"', index+1);
    }
}
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So, Java 1.3 doesn't have String.replaceAll? Can we write our own?

public class StringReplaceAll {

    public static String replaceAll(String text, String find, String replace) {
        if (text == null || find == null || replace == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException();
        }
        if (find.length() == 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
        int start = 0;
        int end = text.indexOf(find, start);
        if (end == -1) {
            return text;
        }
        int findLen = find.length();
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(text.length());
        while (end != -1) {
            sb.append(text.substring(start, end));
            sb.append(replace);
            start = end + findLen;
            end = text.indexOf(find, start);
        }
        sb.append(text.substring(start));
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static void assertEquals(String s1, String s2) {
        if (s1 == null || s2 == null)
            throw new RuntimeException();
        if (!s1.equals(s2))
            throw new RuntimeException("<" + s1 + ">!=<" + s2 + ">");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        assertEquals("lazy fox jumps lazy dog",
                replaceAll("quick fox jumps quick dog",
                        "quick",
                        "lazy"));

        assertEquals("quick fax jumps quick dag",
                replaceAll("quick fox jumps quick dog", "o", "a"));

        assertEquals("",
                replaceAll("quick fox jumps quick dog",
                        "quick fox jumps quick dog",
                        ""));

        assertEquals("quick fox jumps quick dog",
                replaceAll("quick fox jumps quick dog", "zzz", "xxx"));

        assertEquals("quick fox jumps quick cat",
                replaceAll("quick fox jumps quick dog", "dog", "cat"));

        assertEquals("zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz",
                replaceAll("aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa", "a", "z"));

        assertEquals("zzzz", replaceAll("aa", "a", "zz"));

        assertEquals("", replaceAll("", "a", "z"));

        try {
            replaceAll(null, "a", "z");
            throw new RuntimeException();
        } catch (NullPointerException e) {
        }

        try {
            replaceAll("a", "z", null);
            throw new RuntimeException();
        } catch (NullPointerException e) {
        }

        try {
            replaceAll("a", null, "z");
            throw new RuntimeException();
        } catch (NullPointerException e) {
        }

        try {
            replaceAll("a", "", "z");
            throw new RuntimeException();
        } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
        }
    }
}
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