Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to select a subset of tds from a table.

I know before hand what the indexes are, but they are effectively random (not odd or even indexes, etc).

For instance say I want to select the 0th, 5th and 9th td.

indexesToSelect = [0, 5, 9];

// 1) this selects the one by one
$('table td').eq(0)
$('table td').eq(5)
$('table td').eq(9)


// 2)this selects them as a group (with underscore / lodash)
var $myIndexes = $();

_.forEach(indexesToSelect, function (idx) {
    $myIndexes = $myIndexes.add($('table td').eq(idx));
});

So (2) works and I am using that, but I wonder if there is a more natural way using jQuery.

Something like passing .eq() an array of indexes? (that doesn't work)

// does not work
$('table td').eq([0, 5, 9])

If not I will write a small plugin for something like .eqMulti(array).

note: there is no class that these tds share exclusively, so selecting based on class won't work.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I'd do it with .filter() and $.inArray():

var elements = $("table td").filter(function(i) {
    return $.inArray(i, indexesToSelect) > -1;
});

Another [more ugly] way is mapping to a selector:

var elements = $($.map(indexesToSelect, function(i) {
    return "td:eq(" + i + ")";
}).join(","), "table");
share|improve this answer
    
I think first one is quite handsome. –  Jai Apr 25 '13 at 11:18
    
Filter looks like what I want, thanks. –  Sean Apr 25 '13 at 11:51

I wrapped VisioN's filter method into a jQuery plugin:

$.fn.eqAnyOf = function (arrayOfIndexes) {
    return this.filter(function(i) {
        return $.inArray(i, arrayOfIndexes) > -1;
    });
};

So now usage is nice and clean:

var $tds = $('table td').eqAnyOf([1, 5, 9]);
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Worked a treat in my new project. –  AshHimself Sep 10 at 11:40

try this

   $('table td:eq(0), table td:eq(5), table td:eq(9)')
share|improve this answer
    
Well, this will do it, but the array of indexes I want is not constant. It would need a function to translate the array into a string like the one you give here. But, for known indexes this is good. –  Sean Apr 25 '13 at 11:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.