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I have two 2D arrays of the same size

a = array([[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]])
b = array([[1,2],[3,4],[7,8]])

I want to know the rows of b that are in a.

So the output should be :

array([ True,  True, False], dtype=bool)

without making :

array([any(i == a) for i in b])

cause a and b are huge.

There is a function that does this but only for 1D arrays : in1d

share|improve this question
2  
What is the actual dtype of a and b? – unutbu Apr 25 '13 at 13:51
    
@unutbu float (could settle to int) – amine23 Apr 25 '13 at 14:01
up vote 6 down vote accepted

What we'd really like to do is use np.in1d... except that np.in1d only works with 1-dimensional arrays. Our arrays are multi-dimensional. However, we can view the arrays as a 1-dimensional array of strings:

a = a.ravel().view((np.str, a.itemsize*a.shape[1]))

For example,

In [15]: a = np.array([[1, 2], [2, 3], [1, 3]])

In [16]: a = a.ravel().view((np.str, a.itemsize*a.shape[1]))

In [17]: a.dtype
Out[17]: dtype('|S8')

In [18]: a.shape
Out[18]: (3,)

In [19]: a
Out[19]: 
array(['\x01\x00\x00\x00\x02', '\x02\x00\x00\x00\x03',
       '\x01\x00\x00\x00\x03'], 
      dtype='|S8')

This makes each row of a a string. Now it is just a matter of hooking this up to np.in1d:

def inNd(a, b, assume_unique=False):
    a = np.asarray(a, order='C')
    b = np.asarray(b, order='C')
    a = a.ravel().view((np.str, a.itemsize * a.shape[1]))
    b = b.ravel().view((np.str, b.itemsize * b.shape[1]))
    return np.in1d(a, b, assume_unique)

import numpy as np


def inNd(a, b, assume_unique=False):
    a = np.asarray(a, order='C')
    b = np.asarray(b, order='C')
    a = a.ravel().view((np.str, a.itemsize * a.shape[1]))
    b = b.ravel().view((np.str, b.itemsize * b.shape[1]))
    return np.in1d(a, b, assume_unique)

tests = [
    (np.array([[1, 2], [2, 3], [1, 3]]),
     np.array([[2, 2], [3, 3], [4, 4]]),
     np.array([False, False, False])),
    (np.array([[1, 2], [2, 2], [1, 3]]),
     np.array([[2, 2], [3, 3], [4, 4]]),
     np.array([True, False, False])),
    (np.array([[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6]]),
     np.array([[1, 2], [3, 4], [7, 8]]),
     np.array([True, True, False])),
    (np.array([[1, 2], [5, 6], [3, 4]]),
     np.array([[1, 2], [5, 6], [7, 8]]),
     np.array([True, True, False])),
    (np.array([[-0.5, 2.5, -2, 100, 2], [5, 6, 7, 8, 9], [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]),
     np.array([[1.0, 2, 3, 4, 5], [5, 6, 7, 8, 9], [-0.5, 2.5, -2, 100, 2]]),
     np.array([False, True, True]))
]

for a, b, answer in tests:
    result = inNd(b, a)
    try:
        assert np.all(answer == result)
    except AssertionError:
        print('''\
a:
{a}
b:
{b}

answer: {answer}
result: {result}'''.format(**locals()))
        raise
else:
    print('Success!')

yields

Success!
share|improve this answer
2  
View it as a record array, I think .view(dtype([(´´, a.dtype)*a.shape[1]])) is what you need, and you have the same trick working for any type. – Jaime Apr 25 '13 at 14:08
    
@Jaime: I tried a1d = a.view([('f0','int32'),('f1','int32')]), b1d = ..., np.in1d(a1d, b1d) but got a TypeError. If you see a way around this, I'd love to know. – unutbu Apr 25 '13 at 14:13
    
This also strangely fails the test case I posted as a comment on @Jan's answer. – amine23 Apr 25 '13 at 14:38
    
But I don't understand why it fails on that case. Also, should this work if I have more than two columns? – amine23 Apr 25 '13 at 15:11
2  
Funny that mergesort doesn't work with generalized dtypes... While it still won't work with this, the simplest way I found to join many fields in a single dtype is dtype((np.void, a.dtype.itemsize*a.shape[1])). – Jaime Apr 25 '13 at 18:34
In [1]: import numpy as np

In [2]: a = np.array([[1,2],[3,4]])

In [3]: b = np.array([[3,4],[1,2]])

In [5]: a = a[a[:,1].argsort(kind='mergesort')]

In [6]: a = a[a[:,0].argsort(kind='mergesort')]

In [7]: b = b[b[:,1].argsort(kind='mergesort')]

In [8]: b = b[b[:,0].argsort(kind='mergesort')]

In [9]: bInA1 = b[:,0] == a[:,0]

In [10]: bInA2 = b[:,1] == a[:,1]

In [11]: bInA = bInA1*bInA2

In [12]: bInA
Out[12]: array([ True,  True], dtype=bool)

should do this... Not sure, whether this is still efficient. You need do mergesort, as other methods are unstable.

Edit:

If you have more than 2 columns and if the rows are sorted already, you can do

In [24]: bInA = np.array([True,]*a.shape[0])

In [25]: bInA
Out[25]: array([ True,  True], dtype=bool)

In [26]: for k in range(a.shape[1]):
    bInAk = b[:,k] == a[:,k]
    bInA = bInAk*bInA
   ....:     

In [27]: bInA
Out[27]: array([ True,  True], dtype=bool)

There is still space for speeding up, as in the iteration, you don't have to check the entire column, but only the entries where the current bInA is True.

share|improve this answer
    
what if a = array([[1,2],[2,3],[1,3]]) and b = array([[2,3],[3,3],[4,4]]) ? – amine23 Apr 25 '13 at 14:32
    
yes.. I've just checked this - then it fails... I'm trying to fix this – Jan Apr 25 '13 at 14:33
    
Edit/Fix: Using in1d may fail, because it does not check for the location of the occurence... Changed it to the == – Jan Apr 25 '13 at 14:41
    
Btw. As the == outperforms in1d by a factor of 8, it now performs much better. – Jan Apr 25 '13 at 14:52
    
this would fail the test case I posted as a comment on Ryan Saxe answer. – amine23 Apr 25 '13 at 14:53

the numpy module can actually broadcast through your array and tell what parts are the same as the other and return true if they are and false if they are not:

import numpy as np
a = np.array(([1,2],[3,4],[5,6])) #converting to a numpy array
b = np.array(([1,2],[3,4],[7,8])) #converting to a numpy array
new_array = a == b #creating a new boolean array from comparing a and b

now new_array looks like this:

[[ True  True]
 [ True  True]
 [False False]]

but that is not what you want. So you can transpose (flip x and y) the array and then compare the two rows with an & gate. This will now create a 1-D array that will only return true if both columns in the row are true:

new_array = new_array.T #transposing
result = new_array[0] & new_array[1] #comparing rows

when you print result you now get what you're looking for:

[ True  True False]
share|improve this answer
    
What if a = array([[1,2],[3,4]]) and b = array([[3,4],[1,2]]) ? – amine23 Apr 25 '13 at 14:46
    
it was not really clear that you wanted to be able to compare all. Your example didn't display that clearlyly...and you want to be able to check if a nested array in b is in a without using a for loop? – Ryan Saxe Apr 25 '13 at 18:39

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