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BCL has introduced a group of Immutable Collections

I am wondering what's the difference between ImmutableSortedSet and the native FSharp Set? It seems that the performance signatures of both are similar. Also I saw somewhere that SortedSet is implemented as a Red Black Tree, so I guess ImmutableSortedSet does the same.

What is the internal implementation of fsharp map? Is is Red Black Tree as claimed here or AVL tree as found out here?

In addition, why MSDN documents don't state clear what the actual data structure is for the library collection? I know these are implementation details and are about to change. My point is that if they don't want to bind the library data type to a certain type of well known data structure, they should at least offer a summery of all the methods performance signatures in terms of complexity?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I am wondering what's the difference between ImmutableSortedSet and the native FSharp Set?

They are generally very similar. The main difference is that the F# Set supports fast set theoretic operations (union, intersection and difference).

Here is a simple F# program that measures the performance of some common operations:

open System.Collections.Immutable

while true do
  do
    let timer = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew()
    let cmp = LanguagePrimitives.FastGenericComparer<int>
    let mutable s1 = ImmutableSortedSet.Create<int>(cmp)
    let mutable s2 = ImmutableSortedSet.Create<int>(cmp)
    for i in 1..1000000 do
      s1 <- s1.Add i
    for i in 1000000..2000000 do
      s2 <- s2.Add i
    printfn "BCL ImmutableSortedSet: add in %fs" timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds
    timer.Restart()
    for _ in 1..10 do
      for i in 1..1000000 do
        ignore(s1.Contains i)
    printfn "BCL ImmutableSortedSet: contains in %fs" timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds
    timer.Restart()
    let s = s1.Union s2
    printfn "BCL ImmutableSortedSet: union in %fs" timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds

  do
    let timer = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew()
    let mutable s1 = Set.empty
    let mutable s2 = Set.empty
    for i in 1..1000000 do
      s1 <- s1.Add i
    for i in 1000000..2000000 do
      s2 <- s2.Add i
    printfn "F# Set: %fs" timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds
    timer.Restart()
    for _ in 1..10 do
      for i in 1..1000000 do
        ignore(s1.Contains i)
    printfn "F# Set: contains in %fs" timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds
    timer.Restart()
    let s = Set.union s1 s2
    printfn "F# Set: union in %fs" timer.Elapsed.TotalSeconds

On my machine, I get:

         BCL ImmutableSortedSet  F# Set
add                2.6s          3.0s
contains           2.1s          1.9s
union              1.1s          0.00004s

So the F# Set is slightly slower to construct and slightly faster to search but orders of magnitude faster for the set theoretic union operation.

What is the internal implementation of fsharp map? Is is Red Black Tree as claimed here or AVL tree as found out here?

As both of your links state, F# uses AVL trees.

This is actually relevant in the context of the performance figures above. AVL trees contain the maximum height of a subtree in each branch and, therefore, allow subtrees to be rebalanced without examining the entire subtree. In contrast, red-black trees contain a single bit of data in each branch so rebalancing subtrees requires the entire trees to be traversed which is asymptotically slower. In layman's terms, the union of two same-sized non-overlapping sets entails little more than creating a new branch containing the two existing trees. Note that the Union in the BCL API cannot even express this: it handles an abstract IEnumerable rather than a concrete set.

In addition, why MSDN documents don't state clear what the actual data structure is for the library collection? I know these are implementation details and are about to change. My point is that if they don't want to bind the library data type to a certain type of well known data structure, they should at least offer a summery of all the methods performance signatures in terms of complexity?

I agree that complexities in the docs would be good.

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The F# Set and Map types are implemented with AVL trees.

I don't know about the MSDN documentation, you'd have to ask the F# team about that :)

In any case, Red-Black trees and AVL trees have the same computational complexity for their main operations. In practice, they have different performance characteristics which may lead you to choose one or the other for your specific application -- Red-Black trees have faster insert/delete because they don't need to do as much rebalancing of the tree, but retrieval is faster in AVL trees thanks to that additional balancing it performs for insert/delete. I imagine that is why AVL trees were chosen for the F# Map and Set implementations -- a Map/Set is usually created once (i.e., not modified) then queried repeatedly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red%E2%80%93black_tree

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AVL_tree

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"I imagine that is why AVL trees were chosen for the F# Map and Set implementations." I had thought that the same reason should apply to Immutable Collection in BCL as well. –  colinfang Apr 25 '13 at 15:04

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