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I'm working with Spring and try to make a ajax call to @ResponseBody in my controller.

UPDATE

Okay, I added the changes I got told to to my ajax settings. My param "jtSearchParam" still has the same encoding problem in IE. + I got an other error, 406, the response Header has the wrong content-type.

Here's my new code

Controller:

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST, consumes="application/json; charset=utf-8", produces="application/json; charset=utf-8")
    public @ResponseBody JSONObject getUsers(@RequestParam int jtStartIndex, @RequestParam int jtPageSize,
            @RequestParam String jtSorting, @RequestParam String jtSearchParam,
            HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws JSONException{

        Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
                .setExclusionStrategies(new UserExclusionStrategy())
                .create();

        List<User> users = userService.findUsers(jtStartIndex ,jtPageSize, jtSorting, jtSearchParam);
        Type userListType = new TypeToken<List<User>>() {}.getType();

        String usersJsonString = gson.toJson(users, userListType);
        int totalRecordCount = userDao.getAmountOfRows(jtSearchParam);

        usersJsonString = "{\"Message\":null,\"Result\":\"OK\",\"Records\":" + usersJsonString + ",\"TotalRecordCount\":" + totalRecordCount + "}";

        JSONObject usersJsonObject = new JSONObject(usersJsonString);

        return usersJsonObject;
    }

So as you see I set the content type in produces but that doesn't help. If i debug the response header it looks like this: (That causes an 406 Not Acceptable from the browser)

response header

And my new ajax settings:

...
headers: { 
                 Accept : "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                "Content-Type": "application/json; charset=utf-8"
            },
            contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
            mimeType:"application/json; charset=UTF-8",
            cache:false,
            type: 'POST',
            dataType: 'json'
...

And my parameters still look the same in the IE!

IE debugged values

share|improve this question
1  
@AkshaySinghal no it's set global like this: <%@page pageEncoding="UTF-8" %> –  James Carter Apr 26 '13 at 5:53
1  
You can't do both writing to the response and returning something. If you want to change the headers you can return HttpEntity<?>. Since your returned content-type is not application/json I guess you don't have Jackson in your classpath. –  zeroflagL Apr 30 '13 at 13:40
1  
@zeroflagL I'll try and change it into HttpEntity. I do have Jackson in my classpath but Spring does neither take produces="application/json; charset=utf-8" why doesn't it take that, this should actually change the response header... –  James Carter Apr 30 '13 at 14:12
1  
produces is used to determine the most appropriate method for a request. I does not change anything. –  zeroflagL Apr 30 '13 at 14:49
1  
@zeroflagL thanks for the suggestion with HttoEntity, even thought I changed into ResponseEntity, still you got me to the clue, see the answer below. But still, my request parameter still has the encoding problem in IE, any ideas? –  James Carter May 2 '13 at 6:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Okay the problem with the json content-type can be solved like this:

With ResponseEntity you're able to change the content-type of the response header, that way ajax can interpret the json object the correct way and you wont get an 406 Http-error.

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
public ResponseEntity<String> getUsers(@RequestParam int jtStartIndex, @RequestParam int jtPageSize,
        @RequestParam String jtSorting, @RequestParam String jtSearchParam,
        HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws JSONException{

    HttpHeaders responseHeaders = new HttpHeaders();
    responseHeaders.add("Content-Type", "application/json; charset=utf-8");

    Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
            .setExclusionStrategies(new UserExclusionStrategy())
            .create();

    List<User> users = userService.findUsers(jtStartIndex ,jtPageSize, jtSorting, jtSearchParam);
    Type userListType = new TypeToken<List<User>>() {}.getType();

    String usersJsonString = gson.toJson(users, userListType);
    int totalRecordCount = userDao.getAmountOfRows(jtSearchParam);

    usersJsonString = "{\"Message\":null,\"Result\":\"OK\",\"Records\":" + usersJsonString + ",\"TotalRecordCount\":" + totalRecordCount + "}";

    return new ResponseEntity<String>(usersJsonString, responseHeaders, HttpStatus.OK);
}

The problem with the encoding can be solved like this:

IE won't encode your "ü, ä, etc." correctly, it'll just add it to your URL like this:"jtSearchParam=wü" but it should actually look like that:"jtSearchParam=w%C3%BC" (If it doesn't you'll get the encoding errors on your serverside when you use IE)

So where ever you add certain values to your URL, make sure to use the JavaScript method encodeURI on that value before you actually add it to your URL Example:

encodeURI(jtSearchParam)

share|improve this answer
    
So who adds jtSearchParam anayway? jTable itself does not seem to have this parameter :) –  zeroflagL May 2 '13 at 9:14
    
@zeroflagL Yes i know, I added it myself cause I want to search in my usertable thought so :) If you want the code i can upload it. –  James Carter May 2 '13 at 9:20

I can find conflict in the content type you are using between plain text and json

dataType: 'json'

contentType: "text/html; charset=utf-8"

my recommendation for you to use json for all parts application/json in header and content type also in the messageConverters you can just add jackson jars and it will convert the java object to json for you just you will need to change your return type @ResponseBody String to @ResponseBody User while User is an pojo bean contains getters and setters for your attributes.

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2  
I'll add these changes and see if it works then, thanks so far –  James Carter Apr 29 '13 at 9:05
1  
@Bobo Zohdy While your recommendation is good, I wonder where you see the conflict. –  zeroflagL Apr 29 '13 at 20:05
    
text/html vs application/json –  Bobo Zohdy Apr 29 '13 at 20:20
2  
@BoboZohdy application/json is not used by the OP anywhere. –  zeroflagL Apr 29 '13 at 20:47
2  
@BoboZohdy See update above plaese, any idea why it still doesn't work + why I can't set the response content-type –  James Carter Apr 30 '13 at 7:20

The parameter encoding problem

I can imagine two reasons why this is happening:

  1. For some reason the browser thinks your page is not encoded in UTF-8
  2. You have not included the CharacterEncodingFilter

The CharacterEncodingFilter solves most of the encoding problems that Spring users experience. It has to be the first filter in the web.xml.

<filter>
    <filter-name>encodingfilter</filter-name>
    <filter-class>org.springframework.web.filter.CharacterEncodingFilter</filter-class>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>encoding</param-name>
        <param-value>UTF-8</param-value>
    </init-param>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>forceEncoding</param-name>
        <param-value>true</param-value>
    </init-param>

</filter>

<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>encodingfilter</filter-name>
    <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
</filter-mapping>

If you plan to use GET requests and use Tomcat ensure that the Connector element in your server configuration has the property URIEncoding="utf-8". Other servers may or may not need a similar setting.

The JSON return problem

This is as easy as adding the Jackson Mapper to the classpath and @ResponseBody to the method's return type. In your case I suggest to create a Message class, that resembles your JSON response. In the simplest case your method could look like this:

   public @ResponseBody Message getUsers(int jtStartIndex, jtPageSize, String jtSorting, String jtSearchParam) {

      List<User> users = userService.findUsers(jtStartIndex ,jtPageSize, jtSorting, jtSearchParam);
      int totalRecordCount = userDao.getAmountOfRows(jtSearchParam);

      Message message = new Message();
      message.setRecords(users);
      message.setTotalRecordCount(totalRecordCount);

      return message;
  }

I deliberately omitted @RequestParam because it usually is not necessary when the parameters of the method have the same name as the request parameters.

If you use jQuery it hardly matters what the actual content-type of the response is, as long as the content can be succesfully parsed as JSON. Use dataType: 'json',though, to prevent jQuery from making a wrong guess.

The content-type does matter, of course, if you use produces. If you don't need it to narrow down the request mappings I suggest to get rid of it.

share|improve this answer
1  
the encoding filter is already existing in my web.xml and the call is a POST and either way my URIEncoding is set to utf-8 anyways. I'll sure take a look at your recommendation for the JSON solution, thanks so far –  James Carter May 2 '13 at 5:59
    
@JamesCarter For what it's worth: Your request is POST but that does not inevitably mean that the parameters are not part of the URL. Anyway, would you mind sharing the rest of your ajax call (i.e. the JavaScript code)? Maybe it helps finding the solution :) –  zeroflagL May 2 '13 at 7:31
    
It's all from a lib called JTable: jtable.org I actually just changed the settings. But the thing that confuses me is that it only doesn't work in IE, Firefox works like charm. IE still got an ASCI encoding as it seems like @zeroflagL –  James Carter May 2 '13 at 7:47
    
@JamesCarter The parameters you are using are all added to the URL by jTable. I guess that the URLs called by the browsers differ from each other. Could you check that? If that's true then it's probably the first reason given in my answer. –  zeroflagL May 2 '13 at 8:15
1  
@JamesCarter So in both browsers the URL contains a part like "jtSearchParam=w%C3%B6" (=wö) and not "jtSearchParam=wö" (or wä, wü, whatever)? –  zeroflagL May 2 '13 at 8:37

I would check to make sure it is calling your json method, as perhaps there is another similar method which is returning text/html.

share|improve this answer
2  
it sure is that method that is called, I debuged it many times checking if it could be an other one getting called, but it's not –  James Carter May 2 '13 at 6:02

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