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I'm trying to copy a subset of a numpy array (to do image background subtraction - but that's by the by). I don't understand what's wrong with the following - I've demonstrated it interactively because you really don't want to wade through all my code...

>>> from numpy import zeros
>>> a = zeros((5,5,3), 'uint8')
>>> print a.shape
(5, 5, 3)
>>> b = a[1:2][1:2][:].copy()
>>> print b.shape
(0, 5, 3)
>>> print a[1:2][1:2][:].shape
(0, 5, 3)
>>> print a.shape
(5, 5, 3)
>>>

What I'd like is for b.shape to return (2,2,3) - and behave that way in the subsequent operations I need to do with it. I'm sure I've done something really obvious wrong, but I can't work out what. Any suggestions gratefully received!

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Thanks to both Noah and Kos. I think I should give up for the day now - elsewhere in the same module I've used the correct index syntax as well... –  Dorsey Apr 25 '13 at 14:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe you meant a[1:3, 1:3, :] instead of a[1:2][1:2][:].

Also, a[1:3, 1:3, ...] would work too (... means "as many : as necessary"). NumPy seems to also allow a[1:3, 1:3].

There are two parts to the explanations:

  1. slicing in Python is left-inclusive and right-exclusive

  2. comma-indexing is necessary here, a[1:3] gives you a shape (2,5,3) and another [1:3] will slice through the first dimension again.

    For simple indexing a[1][2][3] is same as a[1,2,3] because each consecutive indexing removes one dimension. That doesn't hold for slicing, though - you need to use commas.

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There are two different problems with what you're doing. The primary one is how you're handling indexing in numpy. Numpy matrices have their own syntax that is much more clear than the list of lists syntax that you're using... Use commas instead of separate indices in brackets:

>>> from numpy import zeros
>>> a = zeros((5,5,3), 'uint8')
>>> print a[1:2,1:2,:].shape
(1, 1, 3)

What you're doing instead is failing because a[1:2] still returns a list of lists, so your next index is an index on the outer list (which only has one element), not the inner list that you want:

>>> a[1:2]
array([[[0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0]]], dtype=uint8)
>>> a[1:2][1:2]
array([], shape=(0, 5, 3), dtype=uint8)

(You wouldn't have this problem if you were using simple indices instead of slices, but you should still use the comma syntax because it's much clearer.

Second, you're using slices wrong. The first value of the slice is the index of the first value of the array that you want--and the indices start at 0. The second value is one MORE than the index of the array that you want. This is so that a[first_index:second_index] returns second_index-first_index points. So, you want something like this:

>>> b = a[0:2,0:2,:]
>>> b
array([[[0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0]],

       [[0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0]]], dtype=uint8)

Your index of [1:2] will only return one element... the second one in the list.

Also, as a side note, .copy() is redundant here because taking slices from a numpy array already creates a new object.

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