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I have a function which takes a 2d-array as an argument. Then I have a 3d-array e.g. temp[5][100][100]. I want to pass the 2d portion of this array to the function. How can I do this?

int inteference_sets(int array[][],int array_size,int max_channel){
     //function codes
}
int main(){
    int k;

    int temp[5][100][100];
    for(k=1;k<=4;k++){
       interference_sets(temp[k], , ) //this is how the program intends to work
    }
 }

Is it possible? If yes, then how?

share|improve this question
    
By "second portion" I assume you mean any of the five 100x100 partitions, by reference/address. –  WhozCraig Apr 25 '13 at 15:04
    
yeah.. i think you got me right ! –  Nasif Imtiaz Ohi Apr 25 '13 at 15:08
    
Then you chose... wisely. –  WhozCraig Apr 25 '13 at 15:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#define DIM1 100
#define DIM2 100

int inteference_sets(int (*array)[DIM2], int array_size, int max_channel)
{
     int row, col;

     for( row = 0; row < array_size; row++ )
     {
         for( col = 0; col < DIM2; col++ )
         {
             int value = array[row][col];
             //function codes
         }
     }
} 

int main()
{
    int k;

    int temp[5][DIM1][DIM2];

    for(k=1;k<=4;k++)
    {
       interference_sets(temp[k], DIM1, ) //this is how the program intends to work
    }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Also note that unlike C++, almost all reasonable intelligent C implementations support VLAs (variable length arrays) including VLA parameters. This allows you to specify at runtime what the compiler would normally require constants to deduce. See it live for an example. Nice answer. –  WhozCraig Apr 25 '13 at 15:26

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