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I have created object type a which has member x and y, also some functions changing the members' value. I have seen the members been changed in debugger. But none of the members are changed. Can you explain? Is there any difference in behaviour of x and y? one is local variable and the other is a parameter.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="debug"></div>
    <script src="Scripts/jquery-2.0.0.min.js"></script>
    <script>
        function a(y) {
            var x = 0;
            return {
                x: x,
                y: y,
                getX: getX,
                getY: getY,
                processX: processX,
                processY: processY,
            }
            function getX() {
                return x;
            }
            function getY() {
                return y;
            }
            function processX() {
                this.x = 1;
            }
            function processY() {
                this.y = 100;
            }
        }
        $(function () {
            var objs = [];
            for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
                objs[i] = a(i);
            }
            objs[0].processX();
            objs[1].processY();
            objs.forEach(function (o) {
                $("#debug").append($("<p>").text(o.x + " " + o.y));
                $("#debug").append($("<p>").text(o.getX() + " " + o.getY()));
//result:
//1 0
//0 0
//0 100
//0 1
//0 2
//0 2
            });
        });
    </script>
</body>
</html>

Strangely if i write a function to access the members, the correct values can be obtained. why???

share|improve this question
    
There's no difference between local variables (var keyword) and fucntion parameters, but there is one to object properties (members). –  Bergi Apr 25 '13 at 16:22

1 Answer 1

You have to explicitly involve this when you want to modify object properties:

        function getX() {
            return this.x;
        }
        function getY() {
            return this.y;
        }
        function processX() {
            this.x = 1;
        }
        function processY() {
            this.y = 100;
        }

In your original code, references to "x" and "y" inside those four functions would be resolved to the local variables "x" and "y" inside the outer function (the function called "a"). That "a" function includes a parameter called "y" and a var declaration for "x".

share|improve this answer
    
so, if i do not, it will make a new local variable? how come i can access the values? –  Hoy Cheung Apr 25 '13 at 15:16
    
@user1978421 in this particular case, "x" in the "processX" function would refer to the "x" declared in function "a", and the "y" in "processY" would refer to the "y" parameter to function "a". –  Pointy Apr 25 '13 at 19:15
    
which x and y does it refer for the x and y inside the return block?? –  Hoy Cheung Apr 25 '13 at 19:18
1  
Same ones. If there's no local var declaration, then JavaScript looks step by step through the layers of enclosing functions. If there's no explicit declaration, then "x" and "y" would be treated as global variables (except in "strict" mode now, in which case such references would be erroneous). –  Pointy Apr 25 '13 at 19:21
    
oh i see. so it's really referencing itself! –  Hoy Cheung Apr 25 '13 at 19:37

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