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Cant figure out how to sort arrayList from an extended class...

Heres what I have:

AddressBook Class:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Iterator;

public class AddressBook
{
  private ArrayList<Entry> data;

  public AddressBook()
  {
    this.data = new ArrayList();
  }

  public String add(Entry paramEntry)
  {
    //Some code      }

   public ArrayList<Entry> getAddressBook()
  {
    return this.data;
  }

  public String getAll()
  {
    //Some code      
   }
}

ExtendedAddressBook Class:

import java.util.*;
import java.lang.Comparable;

public class ExtendedAddressBook extends AddressBook
{

   public ExtendedAddressBook()
    {

    }

    public String getAll()
    {
        String listAll = "Address Book\n";

        ArrayList<Entry> allEntries = getAddressBook();

        Collections.sort(allEntries);

        for ( Entry entry : allEntries )
        {

                ListAll = ListAll + entry.toString();

        }
        return ListAll;
    }

}

AllEntries Class:

import java.lang.Comparable;

public class AllEntries extends Entry implements Comparable<Entry> 
{

    public int compareTo(Entry otherEntry) 
    {
        int d = this.getFirstName().compareTo(otherEntry.getFirstName());
        if (d == 0)
        {
           d =  this.getLastName().compareTo(otherEntry.getLastName()); 
         }
        return d;

    }
}

When I try to compile I get the 'No suitable method found for sort(java.util.ArrayList) on the following line Collections.sort(allEntries); in the ExtendedAddressBook class. Could somebody point me to where I am going wrong and if its even possible to extend a class so the arrayList can be sorted? Thanks

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6  
this question would be a lot easier to answer if you would include a SSCCE, and a clearer and more focused description of your problem –  Sam I am Apr 25 '13 at 15:15
    
Is this homework? If so please flag as such. Take a look at what type you are sorting. –  km1 Apr 25 '13 at 15:17
    
@SamIam if you had seen my original code you would see iv omitted more than half the methods this program contains. Included all the methods that were needed incase its some silly mistake I made that I cant see –  ToniHopkins Apr 25 '13 at 15:18
    
@ToniHopkins so you posted half your program... that's a far cry from a SSCCE –  Sam I am Apr 25 '13 at 15:29

4 Answers 4

You have a couple problems. First, you create an AllEntries class that extends Entry adding the Comparable interface, but then you don't actually create any AllEntries objects. But you shouldn't be doing that anyway. Instead you should just do this:

Collections.sort(allEntries, new Comparator<Entry>() {
    public int compare(Entry o1, Entry o2) {
        return o1.getFirstName().compareTo( o2.getFirstName() );
    }
});

---- COMPLETE EXAMPLE ----

package com.example;


import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;


public class SortExample {
    private static class Entry {
        private String firstName;
        private String lastName;

        public Entry( String firstName, String lastName ) {
            this.firstName = firstName;
            this.lastName = lastName;
        }

        public String getFirstName() {
            return firstName;
        }

        public String getLastName() {
            return lastName;
        }

        public String toString() {
            return firstName + " " + lastName;
        }
    }

    public static void main( String[] args ) {
        List<Entry> list = new ArrayList<Entry>();
        list.add( new Entry( "Homer", "Simpson" ) );
        list.add( new Entry( "George", "Jettson" ) );
        list.add( new Entry( "Fred", "Flinstone" )  );
        list.add( new Entry( "Fred", "Durst" ) );

        Collections.sort( list, new Comparator<Entry>() {
            public int compare( Entry o1, Entry o2 ) {
                int compareValue = o1.getFirstName().compareTo( o2.getFirstName() );
                if ( compareValue == 0 ) {
                    compareValue = o1.getLastName().compareTo( o2.getLastName() );
                }
                return compareValue;
            }
        } );

        for ( Entry entry : list ) {
            System.out.println( entry );
        }
    }
}
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So I can scrub the AllEntries class and just put the above code within the ExtendedAddressBook class? If thats correct I tried it but get another error stating java.util.Comparator is abstract; cannot be instantiated. Tried playing around with the code but to no avail... –  ToniHopkins Apr 26 '13 at 10:48
1  
@ToniHopkins, Yes, scrub the AllEntries class. I assure you it does work, see the above complete example (which has been compiled and tested). –  Lucas Apr 26 '13 at 14:05

There are two versions of Collections.sort.

The first one takes only a collection as an argument, and sorts its elements according to their natural ordering. That is, the element type must implement Comparable, and it is the compareTo method of this class that is used to determine how the elements are ordered.

The second one takes a collection and a Comparator as an argument, and sorts the elements according to the Comparator. This means that there is no restriction on the type of elements in the collection.

You can take this approach to write your own Comparator<Entry> instead of modifying the existing classes, and then pass this into Collections.sort. Since this is an assignment I'll leave it to you from here...

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It seems you don't need the class AllEntries..

edited based on comment: Since Entry cannot be modified, change tha class AllEntries to a EntryComparator implements Comparator<Entry> and do a compare() method, using as base the compareTo() method you created already

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I should mention im not allowed to modify the code within the AddressBook and Entry classes. These were provided for us and we cannot change them, only extend. –  ToniHopkins Apr 25 '13 at 15:20
2  
Ok, then you need to create a Comparator and use on the Collections.sort method –  joaonlima Apr 25 '13 at 15:22
up vote 0 down vote accepted

UPDATE - Got this working by replacing the AllEntries class with:

public class EntryComparator implements Comparator<Entry>
{    
    public int compare(Entry o1, Entry o2) {
       //The compare code

    }
}

And calling the method within the ExtendedAddressBook using:

Collections.sort(allEntries, new EntryComparator()); 
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