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Been scratching my head a lot on that one.

I have a nested list in the format:

( (value1, value2, value3), (value1, value2, value3), ... (value1, value2, value3))

Now I'm trying to get it down to:

( (value1, value2), (value1, value2), ... (value1, value2))

In short, trying to remove the 3rd element of each nested list.

Is this possible in Python straight-forwardly?

share|improve this question
    
You have tuples here; lists have [] square brackets.. – Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 15:48
    
Do you want to make that in place or to get a separate instance? – bereal Apr 25 '13 at 15:49
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can do this simply with a list comprehension:

>>> x = [(1, 2, 3), (1, 2, 3), (1, 2, 3)]
>>> x = [(a, b) for (a, b, c) in x]
[(1, 2), (1, 2), (1, 2)]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for not using slicing – unkulunkulu Apr 25 '13 at 15:49
1  
there is something odd with your use of >>> – ascobol Apr 25 '13 at 15:53
    
@unkulunkulu: Yet slicing would be faster than unpacking and re-packing for each sublist in the sequence. :-) – Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 15:56
    
Note that in Python 3 you can do crazy things like [head for *head, tail in x] to extract all but the last. – DSM Apr 25 '13 at 16:01
1  
@ascobol Err, yeah, wrong way around. That'll teach me for trying to code at 2am... – Yuushi Apr 25 '13 at 16:16

Use a list comprehension:

outerlist = [sublist[:-1] for sublist in outerlist]

This uses slicing to remove the last element of each contained sublist.

The above creates a list(), not a tuple(); the following would create a tuple again:

outertuple = tuple(sublist[:-1] for sublist in outertuple)

Slicing the sublist takes fewer opcodes than unpacking and re-packing a tuple, getting the result to you faster.

Demo using tuples:

>>> outertuple = ((1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9))
>>> tuple(sublist[:-1] for sublist in outertuple)
((1, 2), (4, 5), (7, 8))

Demo using a list:

>>> outerlist = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> [sublist[:-1] for sublist in outerlist]
[[1, 2], [4, 5], [7, 8]]

And last but not least, bytecode disassemblies for the inner loops of the list comprehensions to show that slicing uses fewer opcodes than unpacking and re-packing:

>>> import dis
>>> def foo(x): return [sublist[:-1] for sublist in x]
... 
>>> def bar(x): return [(a, b) for (a, b, c) in x]
... 
>>> dis.dis(foo)
  1           0 BUILD_LIST               0
              3 LOAD_FAST                0 (x)
              6 GET_ITER            
        >>    7 FOR_ITER                16 (to 26)
             10 STORE_FAST               1 (sublist)
             13 LOAD_FAST                1 (sublist)
             16 LOAD_CONST               1 (-1)
             19 SLICE+2             
             20 LIST_APPEND              2
             23 JUMP_ABSOLUTE            7
        >>   26 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> dis.dis(bar)
  1           0 BUILD_LIST               0
              3 LOAD_FAST                0 (x)
              6 GET_ITER            
        >>    7 FOR_ITER                27 (to 37)
             10 UNPACK_SEQUENCE          3
             13 STORE_FAST               1 (a)
             16 STORE_FAST               2 (b)
             19 STORE_FAST               3 (c)
             22 LOAD_FAST                1 (a)
             25 LOAD_FAST                2 (b)
             28 BUILD_TUPLE              2
             31 LIST_APPEND              2
             34 JUMP_ABSOLUTE            7
        >>   37 RETURN_VALUE        

11 versus 14 opcodes. That's one extra UNPACK_SEQUENCE and two more STORE_FAST opcodes, and a BUILD_TUPLE opcode versus SLICE+2.

These differences make unpacking and packing quite a bit slower:

>>> import timeit
>>> test = [(42, 69, 180) for _ in xrange(1000)]
>>> timeit.timeit('f(x)', 'from __main__ import test as x, foo as f', number=10000)
1.1722910404205322
>>> timeit.timeit('f(x)', 'from __main__ import test as x, bar as f', number=10000)
1.6375460624694824
share|improve this answer
    
You get a +1 from me. However, in this case, go for what looks nicer, not what is faster - worrying about this definitely falls into worrying about premature optimization. – Yuushi Apr 25 '13 at 16:18
    
@Yuushi: normally, I'd agree with you but in list comprehensions you want to be careful. This is the inner part of a loop, and just being aware of the differences between techniques beforehand helps. Besides, slicing vs. unpacking/repacking is hardly less readable, is it? – Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 16:19
    
Sorry, I wasn't insinuating that it was less readable (honestly it's probably slightly more readable), just that unless this really came up as a bottleneck in a profiler, I wouldn't worry about it. But having the analysis there is certainly useful for when it is a problem. – Yuushi Apr 25 '13 at 16:22
    
@Yuushi: I see this as basic knowledge; like knowing that using sets for membership tests is way faster than a large list, knowing when to use itertools, bisect, heapq, etc. – Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 16:37
    
+1 for explaining the difference between slicing and repacking. It's only "premature optimization" if you already had the repacking solution, and wanted to switch to the slicing one. Since the OP had neither, it's just a "more optimal solution". – Aya Apr 25 '13 at 17:04
>>> a = ((1,2,3), (4,5,6), (7,8,9))
>>> a = tuple([(x1, x2) for (x1, x2, x3) in a])
>>> a
((1, 2), (4, 5), (7, 8))
share|improve this answer
nested_list= [[1,2,3],[4,5,6]]

for regular_list in nested_list:
    del regular_list[2]
share|improve this answer
    
Why downvote? It works. Iterating over the lists gets you the sublists, and the del listname[indexyouwantgone] gets rid of a given element. He didn't necessarily say he wanted to delete the last element. – BWStearns Apr 25 '13 at 15:52
    
Perhaps because the OP seems to have tuples, which are immutable? – Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 15:53
    
He probably shouldn't use tuples if he wants to change them. – BWStearns Apr 25 '13 at 15:56
    
I agree on that point. – Martijn Pieters Apr 25 '13 at 15:58

Try this:

[a[ :-1] for a in b]

Or this:

[a[:n]+a[n+1:] for a in b]
share|improve this answer

Using map:

l = [[0,1,2], [1,2,3]]
print map(lambda l : l[:-1], l)
# Outputs [[0, 1], [1, 2]]

Given that all sub-lists are of length 3.

If you want this for tuples:

l = ((0,1,2), (1,2,3))
print tuple(map(lambda l : l[:-1], l))
# Outputs ((0, 1), (1, 2))
share|improve this answer
x = [(1, 2, 3), (1, 2, 3), (1, 2, 3)]
>>> [i[:2] for i in x ]

[(1, 2), (1, 2), (1, 2)]

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