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I want to modify the famous binary search algorithm to return the index of the next bigger item instead of the key being searched.

So we have 4 cases:

  1. the key is smaller than all items, return 0.
  2. the key is bigger than all items, return items.length.
  3. the key is found at index x, return x+1.
  4. the key isn't found, return the index of the next bigger one.

e.g: items: { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 }

  • search for 0 returns 0.
  • search for 11 or 12 returns 6.
  • search for 5 or 6 returns 3.

    while (low <= high) {
        mid = (low + high) / 2;
        if (data[mid] < val)
            low = mid + 1;
        else if (data[mid] > val)
            high = mid - 1;
        else {
            break;
        }
    }
    

Currently got it working by examining low and high values. Is there any interesting code to do so!

EDIT !!!

here is how I get it working:

    if (low <= high)
        found = (low + high) / 2 + 1;
    else if (low >= data.length)
        found = data.length ;
    else if (high < 0)
        found = -1;
    else
        found = low;

I am looking for a more elegant way!

EDIT II !!!

this code works if no duplicates. to handle the case of duplicates we need to modify the first if condition:

if (low <= high)
    found = (low + high) / 2 + 1;

to iterate until it finds a bigger element.

share|improve this question
2  
You're implementing the algorithm of std::upper_bound. –  Mark Ransom Apr 25 '13 at 16:27
    
"search for 4 or 5 returns 3" wrong! Search for 4 should return 2, and for 5 return 3. –  ElKamina Apr 25 '13 at 16:28
    
@ElKamina corrected search for 5or 6 return 3! –  mmohab Apr 25 '13 at 16:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following code finds the first item with key greater than the target key...

while (upperbound > lowerbound)
{
  testpos = lowerbound + ((upperbound-lowerbound) / 2);

  if (item[testpos] > goal)
  {
    //  new best-so-far
    upperbound = testpos;
  }
  else
  {
    lowerbound = testpos + 1;
  }
}

It's quoted from this answer, which tries to explain the one-comparison-per-iteration binary search and how to adapt it.

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Here is what you want. It returns the next bigger element. EDIT: now it is working, I hope.

public int binarySearch(int[] arr, int key) {
    int lo = 0;
    int hi = arr.length - 1;int mid = 0;
    while (lo <= hi) {
        mid = lo + (hi - lo) / 2;
        if      (key < arr[mid]) hi = mid - 1;
        else if (key > arr[mid]) lo = mid + 1;
        else return mid;
    }
    return -mid-1;
}

public int myBinarySearch(int[] arr, int key){
     int x = binarySearch(arr, key);
     if(x > 0)
          return mid + 1;
     else
          return -mid;
}
public static void main(String args[]) {
  int arr[] = { 1, 3,3,3,3,3,3, 5, 7, 9, 11};
  Binary jl = new Binary();
  System.out.println(jl.binarySearch(arr, 4));
}
share|improve this answer
    
actually I want to implement my version of binary search instead of using Collections.binarySearch() –  mmohab Apr 25 '13 at 16:38
    
@smttsp This only works if there are no repeated items in the array. If you have three items that are the same, and the binary search returns the first or second of these, then your approach will not return the next larger item. After the binary search, you have to scan the array upwards to look for a different value. –  sfstewman Apr 25 '13 at 16:53
    
@sfstewman nice catch :) –  mmohab Apr 25 '13 at 16:56
    
I see this doesn't work. At least helps you find out something :) –  smttsp Apr 25 '13 at 16:58
    
I changed it and it is working –  smttsp Apr 25 '13 at 17:05

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