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I have an interface Value and a class Record

public interface Value<T> {
    T getRawValue();
}

public class Record<Value<T>> {

    private Value<T> value;     

    T getRecordRawValue() {
        return value.getRawValue();
    }

}

Java will not compile this and complains about the Generics declaration > . Could someone enlighten me as to why this is invalid syntax?

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3 Answers 3

You need bound your generic type to indicate the requirement of it being a Value<T>, and you also need to preserve the type that value Value<T> is providing, therefore your Record class requires two generic types: T: The type of the values returned and U: the type that represents a Value<T>

public class Record<T, U extends Value<T>>

Here you have a full example of this:

public interface Value<T> {
    T getRawValue();
}

public class Record<T, U extends Value<T>> {

    public Record(U value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    private U value;

    T getRecordRawValue() {
        return value.getRawValue();
    }

}

public class StringValue implements Value<String> {

    @Override
    public String getRawValue() {
        return "raw";
    }
}

public class StrongValue implements Value<String> {

    @Override
    public String getRawValue() {
        return "Rrrrraaawww";
    }
}

public class StringRecord extends Record<String, StringValue> {

    public StringRecord(StringValue valueProvider) {
        super(valueProvider);
    }

    public String report() {
        return super.getRecordRawValue();
    }
}
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-1 The recursive type parameter doesn't make sense here. It should either be Record<T> or Record<T extends Value<V>, V>. –  Paul Bellora Apr 25 '13 at 17:39
    
@PaulBellora you are right. This will make the type of the 'getRecordValue' of Value<T> and not <T> what is the goal of the question. I've updated the answer to reflect this. –  maasg Apr 26 '13 at 15:37
    
Looks pretty good - I think you have T and U backwards in Record though. –  Paul Bellora Apr 26 '13 at 16:01
    
@PaulBellora oops :-) I changed that to match the explanatory text and forgot to do it everywhere :-) –  maasg Apr 26 '13 at 16:09
    
Looks good. +1! –  Paul Bellora Apr 26 '13 at 16:31

The code public class Record<Value<T>> attempts to declare a generic type parameter for the class called Value<T>, but when declaring a generic type parameter, it should be a simple identifier such as T.

Try

public class Record<T>
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Thanks for the response. What I am trying to do is be able to use record like new Record<Value<Long>>() –  user2320678 Apr 25 '13 at 16:36
    
So, you can do new Record<Long>(). Does the client have to know that inside you are using Value<T> ? –  Fildor Apr 25 '13 at 16:45

Your Record class is wrongly declared. It should be

public class Record<T> {
    //contents...
}
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