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I have a set of PHP language files which I use to output text to the user based on the their language choice. I have passed the PHP variables to javascript successfully and they are available as LANG You can see it in use in the code.

Here is my question... Since the code as shown below works perfectly, why can I not change this line...

'No': { 'class' : ''}}

to

LANG.no: { 'class'  : ''}}

Basically I want to know why I can use LANG elsewhere in the code but not in the line shown above or in the equivalent "Yes" line.

Here is the working code:

$.confirm({
    'title': LANG.return_to_exhibit_lobby,
'message': "<strong>"+LANG.return_to_exhibit_lobby_confirmation+"</strong>",
'buttons': {
'Yes': { 
    'class': 'special',
    'action': function(){
        window.location.href='logout.php';
    }},
'No': { 'class' : ''}}
});
share|improve this question
    
Why? Because the confirm code expects "No"? and it would need to look like Lang : { no : { class... } } –  epascarello Apr 25 '13 at 16:59
    
@epascarello I don't think that is true because I could change it to something absurd like 'banana'. I just can't but a variable name... Only a string. It can be anything... doesn't have to be "No" –  G-J Apr 25 '13 at 17:01
    
@epascarello I tried the code as you suggested and it outputted "LANG" instead of "No" –  G-J Apr 25 '13 at 17:05

2 Answers 2

What you could do instead:

var params = {
    'title': LANG.return_to_exhibit_lobby,
    'message': "<strong>"+LANG.return_to_exhibit_lobby_confirmation+"</strong>",
    'buttons': {
        'Yes': { 
            'class': 'special',
            'action': function(){
                window.location.href='logout.php';
             }}
};

params.buttons[LANG.No] = { 'class' : ''};

$.confirm(params);
share|improve this answer
    
It did the trick... Thanks! –  G-J Apr 25 '13 at 17:12

That's because you're in an object literal. Syntax rules are different there because you are declaring a structure, not acting on it. You could do this:

var data = {
    'title': LANG.return_to_exhibit_lobby,
    'message': "<strong>"+LANG.return_to_exhibit_lobby_confirmation+"</strong>",
    'buttons': {}
};
data.buttons[Lang.No] = { 'class' : ''}
$.confirm( data );
share|improve this answer
    
That is some smart code, have an upvote. –  BNL Apr 25 '13 at 17:02
    
@BNL Well sorry about that, posted at the same time... –  Simon Boudrias Apr 25 '13 at 17:04
    
No problem..... –  BNL Apr 25 '13 at 17:05
    
@SimonBoudrias It did the trick... Thanks! –  G-J Apr 25 '13 at 17:11
    
You need to declare buttons first. params.buttons = {} or do as I did in my edited answer –  Simon Boudrias Apr 25 '13 at 17:28

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