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I am trying to do some parallel programming. I have been following a guide and I have this code:

void main() 
{
    CPUs = GetNumCPUs();
    HANDLE *threads = new HANDLE[CPUs];
    queues = new queue<functionPointer>[CPUs];
    DWORD_PTR threadID = 0;
    DWORD_PTR threadCore = 1 << 0;

    threads[0] = CreateThread(NULL, 0, (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)loop, (LPVOID)&queues, NULL, &threadID);
    SetThreadAffinityMask(threads[0], threadCore);

    for (DWORD_PTR i = 1; i < CPUs; i++)
    {
        threadID = i;
        threadCore = 1 << i;

        threads[i] = CreateThread(NULL, 0, (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)Coroutine, (LPVOID)&queues[i], NULL, &threadID);
        SetThreadAffinityMask(threads[i], threadCore);

        wprintf(L"Creating Thread %d (0x%08x) Assigning to CPU 0x%08x\r\n", i, (LONG_PTR)threads[i], threadCore);
    }

    while(true) Sleep(1000);
}

The function the threads is just adding 1 to a variable. I have seen that this code is not faster than the code without the threads. I think that I did something wrong in it and it is not multicore. What is it?

Here is the guild: http://www.dreamincode.net/forums/topic/52380-multi-threading-on-multi-processors/ Adding 1 the a varible was an example. I have a very complicated program that is taking 8-9 secondes to finish. That why I am need the multi processing.

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Could you provide a link to the tutorial or guide where this is from? Making something multithreaded doesn't have to mean that anything will be executed faster. The overhead of creating and managing threads sometimes will even slow down the execution. –  Excelcius Apr 25 '13 at 17:49
    
Here is the guild: dreamincode.net/forums/topic/… Adding 1 the a varible was an example. I have a very complicated program that is taking 8-9 secondes to finish. That why I am need the multi processing. –  user2320928 Apr 25 '13 at 18:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are not running your code on a multi-processor/multi-core system then you will not see any performance gain.

If you are but your threads are just doing simple processing (adding 1 to a variable?) it may cost more processor cycles to spawn/shutdown the thread than it does for the thread to do its work. In which case you'd be better off doing all the work in a single thread.

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+1. On a single-core machine, threads are only really useful when a single thread would otherwise be stuck waiting for something (usually I/O). For multi-core, the granularity of the work becomes key; too small, and you'll be spending all your time just switching contexts. –  cHao Apr 26 '13 at 15:48

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