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Can anyone explain why b gets rounded off here when I divide it by an integer although it's a float?

#include <stdio.h>

void main() {
    int a;
    float b, c, d;
    a = 750;
    b = a / 350;
    c = 750;
    d = c / 350;
    printf("%.2f %.2f", b, d);
    // output: 2.00 2.14
}

http://codepad.org/j1pckw0y

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marked as duplicate by Bo Persson, Jean-Bernard Pellerin, jdehaan, Abimaran Kugathasan, Tad Donaghe Apr 26 '13 at 6:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
"Why?" - Because the language was designed that way. If you want a float, you cast to a float first. –  Mysticial Apr 25 '13 at 18:13
    
Just because the left-hand side of an assignment is a float doesn't mean that the right hand side has to be--it only means that the right-hand side must offer equal or less precision that a float, hence the compiler has no reason to make it anything other than int. –  Approaching Darkness Fish Apr 25 '13 at 18:14
    
Because a and 350 are ints. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 25 '13 at 18:15
1  
Because that's the way Kernighan and Ritchie defined it. –  Hot Licks Apr 25 '13 at 18:27
    
@ValekHalfHeart “equal or less precision” has nothing to do with it. int i = 2.0; and double d = 1; are both valid, whatever your definition of “precision” is. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 25 '13 at 18:34

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is because of implicit conversion. The variables b, c, d are of float type. But the / operator sees two integers it has to divide and hence returns an integer in the result which gets implicitly converted to a float by the addition of a decimal point. If you want float divisions, try making the two operands to the / floats. Like follows.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int a;
    float b, c, d;
    a = 750;
    b = a / 350.0f;
    c = 750;
    d = c / 350;
    printf("%.2f %.2f", b, d);
    // output: 2.14 2.14
    return 0;
}
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The result does not get cast into a float. A cast is something explicit that the programmer does. The result is implicitly converted from an int to a float. Terminology is important. –  Nik Bougalis Apr 25 '13 at 18:20
1  
Thanks. I'll edit it here and take care of it in the future. :) –  Sukrit Kalra Apr 25 '13 at 18:21
    
Yes. Can't believe I missed that. I simply copied the OP's code and fixed the float lines. I'll fix this now. :) –  Sukrit Kalra Apr 25 '13 at 18:31
1  
Oh. Cool. That's new knowledge to me. I'll remember that in the future. I'll edit this too in fact, so that if anyone sees this thread again, they know the difference. :) –  Sukrit Kalra Apr 25 '13 at 18:36
1  
@SukritKalra Here is a quiz in which the f suffix makes a difference: blog.frama-c.com/index.php?post/2011/11/08/Floating-point-quiz –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 25 '13 at 18:42

Use casting of types:

int main() {
    int a;
    float b, c, d;
    a = 750;
    b = a / (float)350;
    c = 750;
    d = c / (float)350;
    printf("%.2f %.2f", b, d);
    // output: 2.14 2.14
}

This is another way to solve that:

 int main() {
        int a;
        float b, c, d;
        a = 750;
        b = a / 350.0; //if you use 'a / 350' here, 
                       //then it is a division of integers, 
                       //so the result will be an integer
        c = 750;
        d = c / 350;
        printf("%.2f %.2f", b, d);
        // output: 2.14 2.14
    }

However, in both cases you are telling the compiler that 350 is a float, and not an integer. Consequently, the result of the division will be a float, and not an integer.

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1  
Would this produce the same result? b = (float) a / 350; –  mushroom Apr 25 '13 at 18:16
    
Yes, it would. You need to typecast any one to a float. –  Sukrit Kalra Apr 25 '13 at 18:18
5  
Actually, 350.0 is a double, and the result of the operation would be a double that is then converted to float for the assignment. 350.0f would be a float. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 25 '13 at 18:18
1  
@DanielFischer Thanks for the clarification. What actually is the difference between a double and a float? –  mushroom Apr 25 '13 at 18:21
4  
@jon The range and precision of the types. They may be equal, but usually, a float is a 32-bit type with 24 bits of precision, the largest finite number it can store is 3.4028235e38, the smallest positive number 1.0e-45, while double is a 64-bit type with 53 bits of precision capable of storing numbers up to 1.7976931348623157e308 and as small as 5.0e-324. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 25 '13 at 18:27

"a" is an integer, when divided with integer it gives you an integer. Then it is assigned to "b" as an integer and becomes a float.

You should do it like this

b = a / 350.0;
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Probably the best reason is because 0xfffffffffffffff/15 would give you a horribly wrong answer...

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1  
Why the downvote? The expectation that integer division give exact results is probably the best reason that division should not implicitly "promote" to a floating point type. (Incidentally, this is one of the things that makes Lua's treatment of numbers hideous to work with.) –  R.. Apr 25 '13 at 18:40
    
The question can be interpreted as “Why does int/int not evaluate as a float since I immediately assign it to a float variable?”. Your answer, although insightful, does not address what may actually be the OP's misunderstanding. Apart from that, maybe it was downvoted because it was just too concise. I thought about it for five minutes and I arrived to the conclusion that it was funny and/or insightful for a reason other than the one you eventually gave. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 25 '13 at 18:59

Dividing two integers will result in an integer (whole number) result.

You need to cast one number as a float, or add a decimal to one of the numbers, like a/350.0.

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Specifically, this is not rounding your result, it's truncating toward zero. So if you divide -3/2, you'll get -1 and not -2. Welcome to integral math! Back before CPUs could do floating point operations or the advent of math co-processors, we did everything with integral math. Even though there were libraries for floating point math, they were too expensive (in CPU instructions) for general purpose, so we used a 16 bit value for the whole portion of a number and another 16 value for the fraction.

EDIT: my answer makes me think of the classic old man saying "when I was your age..."

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Chapter and verse

6.5.5 Multiplicative operators
...
6 When integers are divided, the result of the / operator is the algebraic quotient with any fractional part discarded.105) If the quotient a/b is representable, the expression (a/b)*b + a%b shall equal a; otherwise, the behavior of both a/b and a%b is undefined.

105) This is often called ‘‘truncation toward zero’’.

Dividing an integer by an integer gives an integer result. 1/2 yields 0; assigning this result to a floating-point variable gives 0.0. To get a floating-point result, at least one of the operands must be a floating-point type. b = a / 350.0f; should give you the result you want.

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