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I have a list:

[(160, 177), (162, 169), (163, 169), (166, 173), (166, 176), (166, 177), (169, 176), (169, 177)]

I want the inverse of this list, so it becomes:

[(177, 160), (169, 162), (169, 163), (173, 166), (176, 166), (177, 166), (176, 169), (177, 169)]

I think you can do something like list1[:-1] or something like that.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In my opinion it's cleaner to reverse the pairs explicitly:

[(snd, fst) for fst, snd in thelist]
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2  
Even though it's not mentioned.. I'm guessing the OP might have more items in real case scenario –  Lipis Apr 25 '13 at 18:34
a=[(160, 177), (162, 169), (163, 169), (166, 173), (166, 176), (166, 177), (169, 176), (169, 177)]
b=[e[::-1] for e in a]
print b

Runnable code in this Bunk - http://codebunk.com/bunk#-It1THfMsVDWUQMq8eRT

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You can also do this using map and reversed but prefer the list comprehension based solution in this case as it requires only a single loop compared to 2 in map version.

In [24]: lis=[(160, 177), (162, 169), (163, 169), (166, 173), (166, 176), (166, 177), (169, 176), (169, 177)]

In [26]: map(tuple,map(reversed,lis))  #use itertools.imap for large lists
Out[26]: 
[(177, 160),
 (169, 162),
 (169, 163),
 (173, 166),
 (176, 166),
 (177, 166),
 (176, 169),
 (177, 169)]
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I was just about to post this but I was afraid since everyone criticizes map as not "Pythonic". This is what it's made for. –  squiguy Apr 25 '13 at 18:37
    
@squiguy who says map is unpythonic? The advantage of map is that it is directly compiled into C code. Though in above case it is going to be slow compared to LC version due to two loops. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 25 '13 at 18:48
    
"map" isn't "unpythonic", it's just a pre-3 way of writing a list comprehension, which produces the same code. map(f,list) is just [f(x) for x in list], which is clearer. –  Lee Daniel Crocker Apr 25 '13 at 19:15
    
I +1 your answer. Just everyone loves list comprehensions and not functional programming. –  squiguy Apr 25 '13 at 20:30
    
Although map is pythonic in many situations, in this case it is less readable and I believe it will also be slower –  jamylak Apr 26 '13 at 1:01

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