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Edit: So I found out that NDSolve for ODE is using Runge Kutta to solve the equations. How can I use the Runge Kutta method on my python code to solve the ODE I have below?

From my post on text files with float entries, I was able to determine that python and mathematica immediately start diverging with a tolerance of 10 to the negative 6.

End Edit

For last few hours, I have been trying to figure out why my solutions in Mathematica and Python differ by 5000 something km.

I am led to believe one program has a higher error tolerance when simulating over millions of seconds in flight time.

My question is which program is more accurate, and if it isn't python, how can I adjust the precision?

With Mathematica, I am less than 10km away from L4 where as with Python I am 5947 km away.

The codes are listed below:

Python

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import odeint
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
from numpy import linspace
from scipy.optimize import brentq

me = 5.974 * 10 ** (24)  #  mass of the earth                                     
mm = 7.348 * 10 ** (22)  #  mass of the moon                                      
G = 6.67259 * 10 ** (-20)  #  gravitational parameter                             
re = 6378.0  #  radius of the earth in km                                         
rm = 1737.0  #  radius of the moon in km                                          
r12 = 384400.0  #  distance between the CoM of the earth and moon                 
d = 300 #  distance the spacecraft is above the Earth                             
pi1 = me / (me + mm)
pi2 = mm / (me + mm)
mue = 398600.0  #  gravitational parameter of earth km^3/sec^2                    
mum = G * mm  #  grav param of the moon                                           
mu = mue + mum
omega = np.sqrt(mu / (r12 ** 3))

nu = -np.pi / 4  #  true anomaly  pick yourself                                   

xl4 = r12 / 2 - 4671  #  x location of L4                                         
yl4 = np.sqrt(3) / 2 * r12  #  y                                                  

print("The location of L4 is", xl4, yl4)

#  Solve for Jacobi's constant                                                    
def f(C):
    return (omega ** 2 * (xl4 ** 2 + yl4 ** 2) + 2 * mue / r12 + 2 * mum / r12
            + 2 * C)


c = brentq(f, -5, 0)

print("Jacobi's constant is",c)

x0 = (re + 200) * np.cos(nu) - pi2 * r12  #  x location of the satellite          
y0 = (re + 200) * np.sin(nu)  #  y location                                       

print("The satellite's initial position is", x0, y0)

vbo = (np.sqrt(omega ** 2 * (x0 ** 2 + y0 ** 2) + 2 * mue /
               np.sqrt((x0 + pi2 * r12) ** 2 + y0 ** 2) + 2 * mum /
               np.sqrt((x0 - pi1 * r12) ** 2 + y0 ** 2) + 2 * -1.21))

print("Burnout velocity is", vbo)

gamma = 0.4678 * np.pi / 180  #  flight path angle pick yourself                  

vx = vbo * (np.sin(gamma) * np.cos(nu) - np.cos(gamma) * np.sin(nu))
#  velocity of the bo in the x direction                                          
vy = vbo * (np.sin(gamma) * np.sin(nu) + np.cos(gamma) * np.cos(nu))
#  velocity of the bo in the y direction                                          

print("The satellite's initial velocity is", vx, vy)

#  r0 = [x, y, 0]                                                                 
#  v0 = [vx, vy, 0]                                                               
u0 = [x0, y0, 0, vx, vy, 0]


def deriv(u, dt):
return [u[3],  #  dotu[0] = u[3]                                                 
        u[4],  #  dotu[1] = u[4]                                                 
        u[5],  #  dotu[2] = u[5]                                                 
        (2 * omega * u[4] + omega ** 2 * u[0] - mue * (u[0] + pi2 * r12) /
         np.sqrt(((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3) - mum *
         (u[0] - pi1 * r12) /
         np.sqrt(((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)),
        #  dotu[3] = that                                                        
        (-2 * omega * u[3] + omega ** 2 * u[1] - mue * u[1] /
         np.sqrt(((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3) - mum * u[1] /
         np.sqrt(((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)),
        #  dotu[4] = that                                                        
        0]  #  dotu[5] = 0                                                       


dt = np.linspace(0.0, 6.0 * 86400.0, 2000000.0)  #  secs to run the simulation    
u = odeint(deriv, u0, dt)
x, y, z, x2, y2, z2 = u.T

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')
ax.plot(x, y, z, color = 'r')
#  adding the Lagrange point                                                      
phi = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100)
theta = np.linspace(0, np.pi, 100)
xm = 2000 * np.outer(np.cos(phi), np.sin(theta)) + xl4
ym = 2000 * np.outer(np.sin(phi), np.sin(theta)) + yl4
zm = 2000 * np.outer(np.ones(np.size(phi)), np.cos(theta))
ax.plot_surface(xm, ym, zm, color = '#696969', linewidth = 0)
ax.auto_scale_xyz([-8000, 385000], [-8000, 385000], [-8000, 385000])
#  adding the earth                                                               
phi = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100)
theta = np.linspace(0, np.pi, 100)
xm = 2000 * np.outer(np.cos(phi), np.sin(theta))
ym = 2000 * np.outer(np.sin(phi), np.sin(theta))
zm = 2000 * np.outer(np.ones(np.size(phi)), np.cos(theta))
ax.plot_surface(xm, ym, zm, color = '#696969', linewidth = 0)
ax.auto_scale_xyz([-8000, 385000], [-8000, 385000], [-8000, 385000])

plt.show()

#  The code below finds the distance between path and l4                          
my_x, my_y, my_z = (xl4, yl4, 0.0)

delta_x = x - my_x
delta_y = y - my_y
delta_z = z - my_z
distance = np.array([np.sqrt(delta_x ** 2 + delta_y ** 2 + delta_z ** 2)])

minimum = np.amin(distance)

print("Closet approach to L4 is", minimum)

Mathematica

ClearAll["Global`*"];
me = 5.974*10^(24);
mm = 7.348*10^(22);
G = 6.67259*10^(-20);
re = 6378;
rm = 1737;
r12 = 384400;

\[Pi]1 = me/(me + mm);
\[Pi]2 = mm/(me + mm);
M = me + mm;
\[Mu]1 = 398600;
\[Mu]2 = G*mm;
\[Mu] = \[Mu]1 + \[Mu]2;
\[CapitalOmega] = Sqrt[\[Mu]/r12^3];
\[Nu] = -\[Pi]/4;

xl4 = 384400/2 - 4671;
yl4 = Sqrt[3]/2*384400 // N;

Solve[\[CapitalOmega]^2*(xl4^2 + yl4^2) + 2 \[Mu]1/r12 + 
   2 \[Mu]2/r12 + 2*C == 0, C]
x = (re + 200)*Cos[\[Nu]] - \[Pi]2*r12 // N
y = (re + 200)*Sin[\[Nu]] // N

{{C -> -1.56824}}

-19.3098

-4651.35

vbo = Sqrt[\[CapitalOmega]^2*((x)^2 + (y)^2) + 
   2*\[Mu]1/Sqrt[(x + \[Pi]2*r12)^2 + (y)^2] + 
   2*\[Mu]2/Sqrt[(x - \[Pi]1*r12)^2 + (y)^2] + 2*(-1.21)]

10.8994

\[Gamma] = 0.4678*Pi/180;
vx = vbo*(Sin[\[Gamma]]*Cos[\[Nu]] - Cos[\[Gamma]]*Sin[\[Nu]]);
vy = vbo*(Sin[\[Gamma]]*Sin[\[Nu]] + Cos[\[Gamma]]*Cos[\[Nu]]);

r0 = {x, y, 0};
v0 = {vx, vy, 0}

{7.76974, 7.64389, 0}

s = NDSolve[{x1''[t] - 
      2*\[CapitalOmega]*x2'[t] - \[CapitalOmega]^2*
       x1[t] == -\[Mu]1/((Sqrt[(x1[t] + \[Pi]2*r12)^2 + 
             x2[t]^2])^3)*(x1[t] + \[Pi]2*
          r12) - \[Mu]2/((Sqrt[(x1[t] - \[Pi]1*r12)^2 + 
             x2[t]^2])^3)*(x1[t] - \[Pi]1*r12), 
    x2''[t] + 
      2*\[CapitalOmega]*x1'[t] - \[CapitalOmega]^2*
       x2[t] == -\[Mu]1/(Sqrt[(x1[t] + \[Pi]2*r12)^2 + x2[t]^2])^3*
       x2[t] - \[Mu]2/(Sqrt[(x1[t] - \[Pi]1*r12)^2 + x2[t]^2])^3*
       x2[t], x3''[t] == 0, x1[0] == r0[[1]], x1'[0] == v0[[1]], 
    x2[0] == r0[[2]], x2'[0] == v0[[2]], x3[0] == r0[[3]], 
    x3'[0] == v0[[3]]}, {x1, x2, x3}, {t, 0, 1000000}];

ParametricPlot3D[
 Evaluate[{x1[t], x2[t], x3[t]} /. s], {t, 0, 10*24*3600}, 
 PlotStyle -> {Red, Thick}]

g1 = ParametricPlot3D[
   Evaluate[{x1[t], x2[t], x3[t]} /. s], {t, 0, 5.75*3600*24}, 
   PlotStyle -> {Red}, 
   PlotRange -> {{-10000, 400000}, {-10000, 400000}}];
g2 = Graphics3D[{Blue, Opacity[0.6], Sphere[{-4671, 0, 0}, re]}];
g3 = Graphics3D[{Green, Opacity[0.6], Sphere[{379729, 0, 0}, rm]}];
g4 = Graphics3D[{Black, Sphere[{xl4, yl4, 0}, 2000]}];
Show[g2, g1, g3, g4, Boxed -> False]


(*XYdata=Flatten[Table[Evaluate[{x1[t],x2[t],x3[t]}/.s],{t,5.5*24*\
3600,5.78*24*3600,1}],1];
X1Y1data=Flatten[Table[Evaluate[{x1'[t],x2'[t],x3'[t]}/.s],{t,5.5*24*\
3600,5.78*24*3600,1}],1];
SetDirectory[NotebookDirectory[]];
Export["OrbitData.txt",XYdata,"CSV"];
Export["OrbVeloc.txt",X1Y1data,"CSV"];*)
share|improve this question
1  
my advice would be to find a problem with an exact analytic solution and solve it both ways. –  george Apr 26 '13 at 13:56
1  
You could try adjusting the atol and rtol arguments of odeint (see docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/…). But this won't tell you if the odeint solution is more or less accurate than the Mathematica solution. –  Warren Weckesser Apr 26 '13 at 16:01
    
one thing you might want to play with is explicitly telling NDSolve what method to use. Both odeint and mathematica are dynamically/adaptively choosing solution methods so its unlikely youll ever get precisely the same results. Without studying the proble carefully its hard to say if the differece you see is significant or in the noise. –  george Apr 26 '13 at 16:25
    
@WarrenWeckesser I changed the atol and rtol to 1e-14 but the trajectory remained unchanged at 5xxx km away. –  dustin Apr 26 '13 at 18:55
    
@george I found out the NDSolve use Runge Kutta. How can I use Runge Kutta on python code to solve the ode? –  dustin Apr 27 '13 at 4:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

If at this point your problem has reduced to just wanting to use Runge-Kutta, you can for example replace this line:

u = odeint(deriv, u0, dt)

with something like this:

#reverse the order of arguments
def deriv2(t,u):
    return deriv(u,t)

# initialize a 4th order Runge-Kutta ODE solver
solver = ode(deriv2).set_integrator('dopri5')
solver.set_initial_value(u0)
u = np.empty((len(dt), 6))
u[0,:] = u0
for ii in range(1,len(dt)):
    u[ii] = solver.integrate(dt[ii])

(+obviously replace the odeint import with ode).

Note that this is significantly slower for this type of ODE.

To use the dop853, use solver.set_integrator('dop853').

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe there is a way to have cython run the heavy computations to speed it up? –  dustin May 5 '13 at 14:54
    
Yes, that might help, but I'm only starting to look into performance tuning. Remember that RK4 is a quite nicely-behaving solver (at least for non-stiff problems), and you probably don't need that many timesteps. –  HenriV May 6 '13 at 8:13

I re-wrote the def deriv part of the ode and it works now! So the Mathematica plot and the Python agree.

def deriv(u, dt):
    return [u[3],  #  dotu[0] = u[3]                                                 
            u[4],  #  dotu[1] = u[4]                                                 
            u[5],  #  dotu[2] = u[5]                                                 
            (2 * omega * u[4] + omega ** 2 * u[0] - mue * (u[0] + pi2 * r12) /
             np.sqrt(((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3) - mum *
             (u[0] - pi1 * r12) /
             np.sqrt(((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)),
            #  dotu[3] = that                                                        
            (-2 * omega * u[3] + omega ** 2 * u[1] - mue * u[1] /
             np.sqrt(((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3) - mum * u[1] /
             np.sqrt(((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)),
            #  dotu[4] = that                                                        
            0]  #  dotu[5] = 0      
share|improve this answer

One way to check the accuracy could be this:

take a time where the 2 trajectories are sufficiently different from one another (the last time/point in the trajectory for example). Use this as the new starting point and integrate back in time to the initial time (or, if you prefer, integrate forward in time, but reverse the velocities of all bodies present in the simulation). The final point in this simulation should be (close to) your initial point in the original simulation. By comparing how close you actually get to your original initial point, you can judge how good python vs mathematica solver routines are. My guess is that the Mathematica routines are much better, so all this Python thing is a waste of time.

Another way could be this: With Mathematica what you get is an interpolating function which you can symbolically derive and then numerically evaluate its derivatives. Plug these values in the ODE at different points and see if they satisfy the ODE. Do something similar in python and compare the results.

share|improve this answer
    
Third option: move this question to the (almost) new mathematica.stackexchange.com sister site , where cool MMA ideas are exchanged every day –  magma Apr 27 '13 at 15:24
    
I found the issue. NDSolve use runge kutta for its integration. I edited my post yesterday asking how this can be implemented with the python code. –  dustin Apr 28 '13 at 22:15
    
how did you determine that? It looks to me like the default is probably adams (same as odeint). Frankly its an annoyance with mathematica that there is usually no simple way to know what it chooses for automatic settings..you can however manually specify methods and see if any gives you significantly different results. –  george Apr 30 '13 at 12:20

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