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Word1252_7bit is a struct
Key is Int32

How can I test for null if value is not found?

There is no w.Key == -1 but I don't know test for not value returned.

The last Debug line throws an exception.

List<Word1252_7bit> Words7bit = GetWord1252_7bit();

Word1252_7bit word1252_7bit ;

word1252_7bit = Words7bit.FirstOrDefault(w => w.Key == 1000);
Debug.WriteLine(word1252_7bit.Key.ToString() + " " + word1252_7bit.Value);

word1252_7bit = Words7bit.FirstOrDefault(w => w.Key == -1);
//if (word1252_7bit == null) Debug.WriteLine("word1252_7bit == null");
Debug.WriteLine( word1252_7bit.Key.ToString() + " " + word1252_7bit.Value ) ;

If I should use something other than FirstOrDefault let me know. Looking for speed searching on a unique Int32.

Not sure if it makes a difference but Key is unique and I use Key to override GetHashCode(), And to save space Key is really a piece of an UInt32

public Int32 Key
{
  get
  {
    return (Int32)( pack[0] & ( (1<<25) - 1 ) ) ;
  }
}

public struct Word1252_7bit : iWord
{
    // this maps 128 values to "Windows-1252" 
    // this is not ASCII 
    // this is SQL char 8bit normalized to FormD, remove control chars, remove redactions, and cast to lower - 129 - just have to cheat on 1
    private static byte[] Win1252_128to256 = new byte[] {  
             32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63
           , 64, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99,100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121
           ,122,123,124,125,126,128,130,131,132,133,134,135,137,139,145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,155,156,160,161,162,163,164,165,166
           ,167,168,169,170,171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185,186,187,188,189,190,191,215,223,230,240,247,248,254 };
    private static Encoding win1252 = Encoding.GetEncoding("Windows-1252");
    private UInt32[] pack;
    public Int32 Key { get { return (Int32)(pack[0] & ((1 << 25) - 1)); } }
    public override bool Equals(Object obj)
    {
        // Check for null values and compare run-time types.
        if (obj == null) return false;
        if (!(obj is Word1252_7bit)) return false;
        Word1252_7bit comp = (Word1252_7bit)obj;
        if (comp.pack == null) return false;
        if (comp.pack.Count() == 0) return false;
        return (comp.Key == this.Key);
    }
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return Key;
    }
    public byte[] Bytes
    {
        get
        {
            byte b;              
            List<byte> bytes = new List<byte>(((pack.Length - 1) * 4) + 1);

            b = (byte)((pack[0] >> 25) & ((1 << 7) - 1));
            bytes.Add(Win1252_128to256[b]);

            if (pack.Length > 1)
            {                       
                UInt32 cur32;
                byte bits4 = 0;
                byte bits3 = 0;
                for (int i = 1; i < pack.Length; i++)
                {
                    cur32 = pack[i];

                    if ((i-1) % 2 == 0)
                    {
                        bits4 = (byte)((cur32 >> 28) & ((1 << 4) - 1));
                    }
                    else
                    {   // pick up that odd i7
                        bits3 = (Byte)((cur32 >> 28) & ((1 << 3) - 1));
                        b = (byte)((UInt32)bits3 | ((UInt32)bits4 << 3));
                        if (b == 0) break;
                        bytes.Add(Win1252_128to256[b]);
                    }

                    b = (byte)(cur32         & ((1 << 7) - 1));
                    if (b == 0) break;
                    bytes.Add(Win1252_128to256[b]);

                    b = (byte)((cur32 >>  7) & ((1 << 7) - 1));
                    if (b == 0) break;
                    bytes.Add(Win1252_128to256[b]);

                    b = (byte)((cur32 >> 14) & ((1 << 7) - 1));
                    if (b == 0) break;
                    bytes.Add(Win1252_128to256[b]);

                    b = (byte)((cur32 >> 21) & ((1 << 7) - 1));
                    if (b == 0) break;
                    bytes.Add(Win1252_128to256[b]);

                    //Debug.WriteLine(win1252.GetString(bytes.ToArray()));   
                }
            }
            return bytes.ToArray();
        }
    }
    public String Value
    {
        get
        {
            return win1252.GetString(Bytes);
        }
    }
    public Int32 Lenght { get { return Bytes.Count(); } }
    public Word1252_7bit(UInt32[] Pack)
    {
        if(Pack == null) throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
        if (Pack.Length == 0) throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
        pack = Pack;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It sounds like you've got an array within a value type, which is rarely a good idea. It's unclear what the bigger picture is here - but perhaps you just want a dictionary? – Jon Skeet Apr 25 '13 at 19:14
    
@JonSkeet Why is an array in a value type a bad idea? Maybe I am going the wrong direction but I am headed away from Dictionary < Int32, string > . I have a very large list of words and getting out of memory exceptions. My chars are only 7 bit so I am packing 4.5 7bit chars in a UInt32. The Key only needs to be 27 bits so using the last 7 from that UInt32 for the first char. – Frisbee Apr 25 '13 at 19:50
    
For one thing, you're wasting space by creating an array at all. For another, creating new Word1252_7bit() will always have a null reference in the array, which is probably undesirable. It's unclear what your struct looks like, but I suspect it could be cleaner. If you want to have a small struct for just the word, that's fine - but then you could have a Dictionary<int, ShortWord>. – Jon Skeet Apr 25 '13 at 19:55
    
@JonSkeet Happy to have you critique the full posted struct. How is that array a waste? Dictionary uses a full int32 for the key and I don't need the full int. I am able to steal 1 7bit char from the Key. I pass the minimum size array needed based on the number of characters in the word. – Frisbee Apr 25 '13 at 20:25
    
Ah, I had thought that you were using a fixed (small) size of array. Does saving these few bits really justify the complexity here? I dare say the simplest possible code is too big - but I bet there are simpler ways which are still cheap enough. – Jon Skeet Apr 25 '13 at 20:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

FirstOrDefault<T> will return the first item found or the default value of T if none is found. For reference types this is null, but this is different for value types. For example, the default value of integers is 0.

You can use the default keyword:

if (word1252_7bit.Equals(default(Word1252_7bit)))
    Debug.WriteLine("not found");

NOTE: You may have to write you're own override of Equals to get the result you expect.

In general, you won't be able to distinguish an item that was not found from an item that was found but which is equal to the default value. You can do this instead:

int foundAt = Words7bit.FindIndex(w => w.Key == -1);
if (foundAt == -1)
    Debug.WriteLine("not found");
else
    word1252_7bit = Words7bit[foundAt];
share|improve this answer
    
Get an error Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'Word1252_7bit' and 'Word1252_7bit' – Frisbee Apr 25 '13 at 19:20
    
Once I fixed a bug in my override Equals the .Equals worked. Thanks – Frisbee Apr 25 '13 at 19:43

To have some more control you could define your own Default value, e.g. using something like:

public static T FirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, T defaultValue)
{
    foreach (var element in sequence)
        return element;
    return defaultValue; // default(T);
    // return sequence.Any() ? sequence.First() : defaultValue;
}

Then use it like

word1252_7bit = Words7bit.Where(w => w.Key == 1000)
    .FirstOrDefault(Word1252_7bit.Default);  

where 'Default' is a default instance defined for your struct. Something like...

public static readonly Word1252_7bit Default = new Word1252_7bit 
{ 
    Key = Int32.MinValue,
    Value = "default",
};

EDIT: Improved FirstOrDefault code (based on the original implementation)

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about using Any First directly. But my concern is that two searches (if Any is true). – Frisbee Apr 25 '13 at 20:28
    
@Blam - actually I just made that fast - I'll dig the original code for it - so I'm guessing just adjusting it then to support the default - and you'll get the performant solution if that's what you're worried about. Most of the time this is more than acceptable I think. I'll update that later on you if you need it, let me know. – NSGaga Apr 25 '13 at 20:44
    
Since I am generating a perfect hash is there some way to take advantage of that. It does not have to be a List. It just needs enumerable so is can be bound to UI repeater and a search on the key. The design objective is memory and a KeyedCollection did not appear to be memory efficient but have not given up on it. – Frisbee Apr 25 '13 at 20:56
    
I edited in the improved FirstOrDefault (based on the original implementation - it's actually dead simple of course:). So you won't be losing any of the performance. I'll take a look at what you just said when I get off work later on. If you can post some more details (edit question - or possibly this sounds like another one - just @ me here). – NSGaga Apr 25 '13 at 21:06

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