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My task is to create a recursive function in Python that takes a list and a value of 0 as its inputs and then adds up all of the odd numbers on the list and returns that value. Below is the code that I have and it keeps returning that the list index is out of range. No matter what I do I can not get it to work.

def addodds2(x,y):
    total=0
    a=x[y]
    while y<len(x):
        if a%2!=0:
            total+=a
            return(addodds2(x,y+1))
        else:
            return(addodds2(x,y+1))
    return(total)
print(addodds2([3,2,4,7,2,4,1,3,2],0))
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5  
Since it's recursive, you probably do not want a loop. Think of your base case. When do you return just a value alone, versus when do you need to return a value including the result of the next recursive call. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 25 '13 at 19:33
    
I hope this is homework, because using recursion for this would be bad in real life. –  cmd Apr 25 '13 at 19:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code should be (the comments explain my corrections):

def addodds2(x,y):
    total=0
    if y<len(x):    #you don't need a while there
        a=x[y]      #you have to do this operation if y<len(x), otherwise you would get the index error you are getting
        if a%2!=0:
            total+=a
        return total+addodds2(x,y+1)    #you have to sum the current total to the result returned by the addodds2() function (otherwise you would got 0 as the final result)
    return total

print(addodds2([3,2,4,7,2,4,1,3,2],0))
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Thank you for your assistance. –  Tammy Logger Apr 25 '13 at 19:45

Since you are trying to solve this recursively, I don't think you want that while loop.

When you are trying to solve a problem recursively, you need two parts: you need a part that does some of the work, and you need a part that handles reaching the end of the work. This is the "basis case".

Often when solving problems like this, if you have a zero-length list you hit the basis case immediately. What should be the result for a zero-length list? I'd say 0.

So, here's the basic outline of a function to add together all the numbers in a list:

Check the length, and if you are already at the end or after the end, return 0. Otherwise, return the current item added to a recursive call (with the index value incremented).

Get that working, and then modify it so it only adds the odd values.

P.S. This seems like homework, so I didn't want to just give you the code. It's easier to remember this stuff if you actually figure it out yourself. Good luck!

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while y<len(x)

So the last y which is smaller than len(x) is y = len(x) - 1, so it’s the very last item of the list.

addodds2(x,y+1)

Then you try to access the element after that item, which does not exist, so you get the IndexError.

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This code can be very short and elegant:

def add_odds(lst, i=0):
    try:
        return (lst[i] if lst[i] % 2 == 0 else 0) + add_odds(lst, i+1)
    except IndexError:
        return 0

Note that, in a truly functional style, you wouldn't keep track of an index either. In Python, it would be rather inefficient, though, but recursion isn't recommended in Python anyway.

def add_odds2(lst):
    try:
        return (lst[-1] if lst[-1] % 2 == 0 else 0) + add_odds2(lst[:-1])
    except IndexError:
        return 0

To make it work with any kind of sequence, you can do the following:

def add_odds3(it):
    it = iter(it)
    try:
        value = next(it)
        return (value if value % 2 == 0 else 0) + add_odds3(it)
    except StopIteration:
        return 0

It's much more efficient, though there's not much sense in using an iterator recursively...

I realize that little of this is relevant for your (educational) purposes, but I just wanted to show (all of) you some nice Python. :)

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