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I am new to python and I hit a roadblock. I have a python list that contains a single list on each line. Basically, I would like to combine lists that share values among lists. For example, below is what my python list looks at the moment and what I would like the data to look like after the additional commands are executed.

I know this sort of problem is ideal for sets and intersections, but I just haven't been able to get them to work correctly. I have also seen a post using indexes and that hasn't worked for me either.

What the list looks like:

[
    ['mary', 'home'],
    ['mary', 'school'],
    ['mary', 'work'],
    ['bob', 'home'],
    ['bob', 'school'],
    ['bob', 'work'],
    ['tom', 'work'],
    ['tom', 'school'],
    ['tom', 'home'],
    ['bill', 'vacation'],
]

What I want it to look like:

[
    ['mary', 'bob', 'tom', 'home', 'school', 'work'],
    ['bill', 'vacation'],
]
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Your example data suggests that order is important in your input data, which would complicate the situation. Assuming that it's actually just an example and order isn't important, sets are indeed an ideal way to solve the problem:

data = [
    ['mary', 'home'],
    ['mary', 'school'],
    ['mary', 'work'],
    ['bob', 'home'],
    ['bob', 'school'],
    ['bob', 'work'],
    ['tom', 'work'],
    ['tom', 'school'],
    ['tom', 'home'],
    ['bill', 'vacation'],
]

combined = []

for subset in [set(d) for d in data]:
    for candidate in combined:
        if not candidate.isdisjoint(subset):
            candidate.update(subset)
            break
    else:
        combined.append(subset)

This uses Python's for-else construct, which not everyone is familiar with. combined will contain a list of sets, so you might want to convert them to lists depending on your use case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Zero, it worked great! You were right, order is not important. –  owen Apr 26 '13 at 16:38
#original list
lists = [
        ['mary', 'home'],
        ['mary', 'school'],
        ['mary', 'work'],
        ['bob', 'home'],
        ['bob', 'school'],
        ['bob', 'work'],
        ['tom', 'work'],
        ['tom', 'school'],
        ['tom', 'home'],
        ['bill', 'vacation']]

#remove sublists from lists
listTemp = []
for list in lists:
    for item in list:
        listTemp.append(item)

#get items from list that have duplicates
listMultiple = []
seen = set()
seen_add = seen.add
setTemp = set(x for x in listTemp if x in seen or seen_add(x))
for item in setTemp:
    listMultiple.append(item)

#get items from list that do not have duplicates
listSingle = [x for x in listTemp if listTemp.count(x) == 1]

print listMultiple
# >>> listMultiple
# ['school', 'work', 'tom', 'home', 'bob', 'mary']

print listSingle
# >>> listSingle
# ['bill', 'vacation']
# lists = [listMultiple, listSingle]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Lars, it worked great too! I especially like how you split the singles and multiples. –  owen Apr 26 '13 at 16:38
    
While this answer happens to work for the specific example data given, it fails badly in the general case. For example, with [['a', 'b'], ['a', 'c'], ['d', 'e'], ['d', 'f'], ['g', 'h']] it gives listMultiple == ['a', 'd'] and listSingle == ['b', 'c', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h'] - in other words, it simply counts occurrences of elements, rather than combining lists with shared elements. –  Zero Piraeus Apr 26 '13 at 17:30

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