Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following classes:

public class Phone {
    private boolean has3g;

    public boolean has3g() {
        return has3g;
    }

    public void setHas3g(boolean newVal) {
        has3g = newVal;
    }
}

public class Blackberry extends Phone {
    private boolean hasKeyboard;

    public boolean hasKeyboard() {
        return hasKeyboard;
    }

    public void setHasKeyboard(boolean newVal) {
        hasKeyboard = newVal;
    }
}

If I was to create an instance of Blackberry, cast it to a Phone object and then cast it back to Blackberry, would the original Blackberry object lose its member variables? E.g:

Blackbery blackbery = new Blackberry();
blackbery.setHasKeyboard(true);

Phone phone = (Phone)blackbery;

Blackberry blackberry2 = (Blackberry)phone;

// would blackberry2 still contain its original hasKeyboard value?
boolean hasKeyBoard = blackberry2.hasKeyboard();
share|improve this question
    
Did you try it? What happened when you did? –  Kal Apr 25 '13 at 20:39
    
I did try it and it worked fine –  S-K' Apr 25 '13 at 20:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Casting doesn't change the underlying object at all - it's just a message to the compiler that it can treat an A as a B.

It's also not necessary to cast an A to a B if A extends B, i.e. you don't need to cast a subtype to its supertype; you only need the cast if it's from a supertype to a subtype

share|improve this answer

If I was to create an instance of Blackberry, cast it to a Phone object and then cast it back to Blackberry, would the original Blackberry object lose its member variables?

You have instantiated a Blackberry. This will remain a Blackberry until the it is GCed.
When you cast it to Phone you are not changing the fact that the type is Blackberry. You are just treating it as a Phone i.e. you have only access to its generic properties (that of Phone).
The extended properties of Blackberry are no longer visible despite the fact that the concrete instance is still a Blackberry and you can successfully cast it back to access the Blackberry properties.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.