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When I use if-let like

(if-let [a 2 b nil] (+ a b))

I get an IllegalArgumentException:

clojure.core/if-let requires exactly 2 forms in binding vector...

Similar for when-let...

This is not what I would expect. If-let could try all bindings and break when one fails and evaluate the else expression.

The same complaint can be found in the comments at clojuredocs. I found an answer here which did not really satisfy since the poster seems to have the equivalent of a nested if-let-structure in mind.

What reasons are there to limit the bindings of the *-let macros?

UPDATE: As it seems to be unclear, what my expectations of if-let are:

  • It should evaluate all bindings sequentially.
  • When all succeed, it should evaluate the 'then'-case.
  • If one binding fails it should immediately break and evaluate the 'else'-case.
  • In case of failure the bindings, even succeeded ones, should not be available in the 'else'-expression
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1  
It's not immediately obvious what your if-let should do. Should it fail at the first false entry in the let clause? Or should it just test the first entry, and if that is true, evaluate the other let clauses for use in the following code? i.e. treating it like a nested function: (if-let [a 2] (let [b nil] (+ a b))) - I've certainly wanted that construct in the past, too... –  Korny Apr 25 '13 at 22:42
    
@Korny: about my expectations, see my updated question. –  nansen Apr 26 '13 at 18:33

3 Answers 3

Try this out:

(defmacro if-let-multi
  ([bindings then-exp]
     (let [values (take-nth 2 (rest bindings))]
       `(if (and ~@values) (let ~bindings ~then-exp) false)))
  ([bindings then-exp else-exp]
     (let [values (take-nth 2 (rest bindings))]
       `(if (and ~@values) (let ~bindings ~then-exp) ~else-exp))))

Here it is in action:

user> (if-let-multi [a 2 b nil] (+ a b))
false
user> (if-let-multi [a 2 b 3] (+ a b))
5
user> (if-let-multi [a 2 b nil] (+ a b) "NO WAY")
"NO WAY"
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This is definitely helpful. Thanks! But why was if-let not behaving that way in the first place? –  nansen Apr 26 '13 at 18:36

if-let and let serve different purposes and if-let is not just a more restricted version of let. of instance if-let differs from let in that the value is bound only for the then clause and not the else.

user> (if-let [ans (+ 1 2 3)] ans :foo)   
6
user> (if-let [ans (+ 1 2 3)] ans ans)
CompilerException java.lang.RuntimeException: Unable to resolve symbol: ans in this context, compiling:(NO_SOURCE_PATH:1)
user> (let [ans (+ 1 2 3)] ans ans)
6   

if-let is intended to make life easier in the case where you are binding a value simply to test and use it.

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I disagree: you shouldn't use if-let if all you're going to do in the then clause is return the value bound by the test. i.e, instead of (if-let [ans (+ 1 2 3)] ans :foo) it is clearly better to write (or (+ 1 2 3) :foo). if-let is useful for testing something and then further manipulating it. –  amalloy Apr 26 '13 at 7:52
    
@amalloy Perhaps I can make this more clear, the code you mention is describing one of the ways if-let and let differ. The last line describes one of the potential uses of if-let. I'll change the word return to use, perhaps that will clarify. –  Arthur Ulfeldt Apr 26 '13 at 17:46
    
@ArthurUlfeldt: I don't want the binding in the else-clause. Updated my question to clarify that. –  nansen Apr 26 '13 at 18:42

Try this out.

(defmacro if-lets
  ([bindings true-expr] `(if-lets ~bindings ~true-expr nil))
  ([bindings true-expr false-expr]
    (cond
      (or (not (seq bindings)) (not (zero? (rem (count bindings) 2))))
        `(throw (IllegalArgumentException. "if-lets requires 2 or multiple of 2 forms in binding vector in user:1"))
      (seq (drop 2 bindings))
        `(if-let ~(vec (take 2 bindings))
                 (if-lets ~(vec (drop 2 bindings))
                          ~true-expr
                          ~false-expr)
                 ~false-expr)
      :else
        `(if-let ~(vec bindings)
                 ~true-expr
                 ~false-expr))))

This macro passed these tests below.

(deftest ut-if-lets
  (testing "if-lets macro (normal cases)"
    (is (= 0 (if-lets [x 0] x)))
    (is (= 0 (if-lets [x 0] x 1)))
    (is (= 1 (if-lets [x nil] x 1)))
    (is (= 0 (if-lets [x 0 y x] y)))
    (is (= 0 (if-lets [x 0 y x] y 1)))
    (is (= 1 (if-lets [x nil y x] y 1)))
    (is (= 0 (if-lets [x 0 y x z y] z)))
    (is (= 0 (if-lets [x 0 y x z y] z 1)))
    (is (= 1 (if-lets [x nil y x z y] y 1)))
    (is (= true (if-lets [x true] true false)))
    (is (= false (if-lets [x false] true false)))
    (is (= true (if-lets [x true y true] true false)))
    (is (= false (if-lets [x false y true] true false)))
    (is (= false (if-lets [x true y false] true false)))
    (is (= true (if-lets [x true y true z true] true false)))
    (is (= false (if-lets [x false y true z true] true false)))
    (is (= false (if-lets [x true y false z true] true false)))
    (is (= false (if-lets [x true y true z false] true false)))
  )
)

(deftest ut-if-lets-ab
  (testing "if-lets macro (abnormal cases)"
    (is (= (try (if-lets [] true false) (catch Exception e (.getMessage e)))
        "if-lets requires 2 or multiple of 2 forms in binding vector in user:1"))
    (is (= (try (if-lets [x] true false) (catch Exception e (.getMessage e)))
        "if-lets requires 2 or multiple of 2 forms in binding vector in user:1"))
    (is (= (try (if-lets [x true y] true false) (catch Exception e (.getMessage e)))
        "if-lets requires 2 or multiple of 2 forms in binding vector in user:1"))
  )
)
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