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I'm just trying Python, and really like it! But I get stucked with try/except.

I have a code that checks raw_input for being integer, but i'd like to make it function, and it doesn't want to be it :)

here the code, I have this:

number_of_iterations = raw_input("What is your favorite number?")
try:
    int(number_of_iterations)
    is_number = True
except:
    is_number = False

while not is_number:
    print "Please put a number!"
    number_of_iterations = raw_input("What is your favorite number?")
    try:
        int(number_of_iterations)
        is_number = True
    except:
        is_number = False

I don't want to repeat myself here& So I think smth about to make function:

def check_input(input_number):
    try:
        int(input_number)
        return True
    except:
        return False

But it make an error if input a string, saying that int can't be used for strings. Looks like it does not see 'try' keyword. Can smone explain why it happens and how to prevent it in future?

share|improve this question
2  
What is the error traceback? How are you calling check_input? – Henry Keiter Apr 25 '13 at 21:39
4  
Don't use except without error class definition. This will mean handling KeyboardInterrupt or such. Use except ValueError or at least Exception. Take a look at pythons built in exceptions. – Vyktor Apr 25 '13 at 21:39
    
In the except cause, raise and see the traceback – spicavigo Apr 25 '13 at 21:42
    
Personally, I'd put return True in an else block of the try/except. It's bad to pile functionality in to a try block when you are using it like an if like you are here. Any of the other statements following the statement you are actually trying to handle errors from will also be caught by the except, which can lead to annoying bugs. try what you are trying, else what the try is ifing. – Silas Ray Apr 25 '13 at 21:43
3  
I'd say you are doing int(number_of_iterations) somewhere outside a try/except block – Krzysztof Bujniewicz Apr 25 '13 at 21:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this, it avoids repeating yourself without needing a def

while True:
    try:
        number_of_iterations = int(raw_input("What is your favorite integer?"))
        break
    except ValueError:
        print "Please put an integer!"

EDIT: Per the suggestions of the commenters, I have added break to the try portion of the block to eliminate the else (the original remains as a reference below). Also, I changed "number" to "integer" because "3.14" would be invalid in the above code.

This was my original suggestion. The above is fewer lines (some may call this cleaner), but I prefer the below because to me the intent is clearer.

while True:
    try:
        number_of_iterations = int(raw_input("What is your favorite integer?"))
    except ValueError:
        print "Please put an integer!"
    else:
        break
share|improve this answer
    
very elegant, thanks for your answer. Don't know, we can use else here.. going to docs. – Pruntoff Apr 25 '13 at 22:05
1  
Or simply while True: try: number_of_iterations = ... break except ValueError: print "Please put a number!" – Eric Apr 25 '13 at 22:08
1  
Perhaps you could avoid the else statement and include break in the try statement, underneath number_of_iterations. Might be a little cleaner – Nick Burns Apr 25 '13 at 22:09

If you want it as a function, decide two things:

  • What is it going to need to work, and
  • What it's going to need to spit back out.

Your use case is that you need some sort of int back, and if it bombs out for whatever reason, it's defined as not a number.

Let's create a tuple as our return value, so we can return a number of some kind and a boolean for "if it is a number".

def check_input(number):
    try:
        return (int(number), True)
    except ValueError:
        return (-999999, False) # Care more about boolean here

We can then use that return value in our while loop like so. Note that I explicitly set the loop condition to False, so we enter in at least once.

is_number = False
num = -999999 # Define out of scope of loop so it can be used

while not is_number:
    print "Please put a number!"
    num, is_number = check_input(raw_input("What is your favorite number?"))

The line num, is_number is a result of tuple packing. Since we're returning a tuple from our method, we can set two distinct variables to the results of that tuple.

share|improve this answer
    
thats good, but do I understand clearly, that it always will ask us to "put a number" at first time? And I have one question.. if it is not hard for you to explain, why you use here such a contruction return (int(number), True) and return (-999999, False) ? First I can understand, but second.. what is "-999999"? Is it chaining with bitwise '~' somehow? – Pruntoff Apr 25 '13 at 22:13
1  
No, it's a dummy value. Admittedly you care less about the integer when it's "not a number" than you would if it was. And yes, given a linear flow through the program, if is_number is False, you will always loop. – Makoto Apr 25 '13 at 22:18

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