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I have two user defined functions (WriteFunction) and (ReadFunction), There is an error in the second function (ReadFunction) which is The keyword does not exist in the current context. (underlining the Name, ID, Age, Email.)

Here is the full code:

//First Function
public static void WriteFunction()
    {

        int count = 0;
        while (count < 10)
        {
            Console.Write(" Enter your Name: ");
            string Name = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.Write(" Enter your ID: ");
            int ID = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

            Console.Write(" Enter your Age: ");
            int Age = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

            Console.Write(" Enter your E-mail: ");
            string Email = Console.ReadLine();

            count++;
        }

    }
    //Second Function
    public static void ReadFunction()
    {
        string output = string.Format("Thank you for registration! Your Submitted information are:" + Environment.NewLine + "Name: {0}"
        + Environment.NewLine + "ID: {1}" + Environment.NewLine + "Age: {2}" + Environment.NewLine + "E-mail: {3}", Name, ID, Age, Email);
        // I using the Environment.NewLine to insert new lines
        Console.WriteLine(output);

    }

Waiting for your answers. Thanks.

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3  
They are out of scope. You need to declare those variables as static outside those functions. –  LarsTech Apr 25 '13 at 21:44
1  
Reading some beginner-level C# tutorials might really help you out a lot. –  Adrian Apr 25 '13 at 21:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

C# is largely an Object-Oriented Language. Among other things state is stored as member variables of objects.

Thus as @LarsTech indicated the your Name, ID, Age, and Email were all local variables to the method. To make them available to another method you need to move them out to be fields of the class.

public class MyFunctions
{
    private static string _name;
    private static int _id;
    private static int _age;
    private static string _email;

    public static void WriteFunction()
    {

        int count = 0;
        while (count < 10)
        {
            Console.Write(" Enter your Name: ");
            _name = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.Write(" Enter your ID: ");
            _id = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

            Console.Write(" Enter your Age: ");
            _age = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

            Console.Write(" Enter your E-mail: ");
            _email = Console.ReadLine();

            count++;
        }

    }

    public static void ReadFunction()
    {
        string output =
            string.Format(
                "Thank you for registration! Your Submitted information are:" + Environment.NewLine +
                "Name: {0}"
                + Environment.NewLine + "ID: {1}" + Environment.NewLine + "Age: {2}" + Environment.NewLine +
                "E-mail: {3}", _name, _id, _age, _email);
        // I using the Environment.NewLine to insert new lines
        Console.WriteLine(output);
    }
}

While I could have have kept the names as you had them, I changed them to better reflect C# convention for private variables.

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1  
Send your email to OP, so that you can easily write all of his/her homeworks :) –  I4V Apr 25 '13 at 21:50
1  
At least get rid of that ugly underscore :) –  Silvermind Apr 25 '13 at 22:05
1  
@Silvermind I am inclined to agree with you. The conventions @LarsTech references includes the underscore. Where I work they still require m_ –  vossad01 Apr 25 '13 at 22:15

You should really read an OOP tutorial since it's one of the most fundamental concepts if you want to move forward with C#.

As for your question, would not be of much help if I were to simply re-write your whole code to make it work the way you want (because yes, it needs to be changed). I strongly recommand you read about OOP and try to understand how it works before getting too deep into it.

In your example you say you want ReadFunction() to inherit from WriteFunction(). A few things here:

You should be good with this start off on the good foot. Also just by looking at the names of your methods, we can tell they are probably not meant to inherit from each other (implying there were classes). Maybe something like :

Parent Class : InformationManager 

Child  Class : ReadInformation inherits InformationManager
Child  Class : WriteInformation inherits InformationManager
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Static things (variables, methods, properties) cannot be inherited. This is by design and I would suggest you to read some c# book to get the understanding of this concept and others correctly.

For your problem, in the 1st method, replace static with virtual. In the 2nd function replace static with override.

Virtual tells the compiler a method is inheritable and override tells the compiler that a method is actually inherited

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