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I am working on validating a certain piece of data, in this case the strin g 'five' should fail a certain piece of validation because it needs to be 5 (an int)

print ">>>>", value
bad_type = type(value).__name__
raise TypeError("expected numeric type for {0} but got '{1}'".format(column,bad_type))

prints:

.>>>> five
...
bad_type = type(value).__name__
TypeError: 'str' object is not callable

However I can do this from the command line:

python -c "print type('five').__name__"

prints

str

what am I doing wrong here? I want to print the type of the value that was passed and failed my custom validation.

share|improve this question
    
'five' is a string, so is '5'. – Hunter McMillen Apr 25 '13 at 23:12
5  
looks like you defined a variable name type somewhere. – Ashwini Chaudhary Apr 25 '13 at 23:14
    
A bit off-topic, if you are looking for a python data validation library then you could take a look at voluptuous, which is small, has a well designed interface and is easily extensible. – miku Apr 25 '13 at 23:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you sure you haven't over-ridden type somewhere?

Also, that's not the Pythonic way for type checking - instead use:

try:
    my_int = int(value)
except (ValueError, TypeError) as e:
    # raise something
share|improve this answer
    
yep, that did it. thanks for the heads up, ill use the pythonic way. btw, what would be the corresponding way I would check if value is an str? – David Williams Apr 25 '13 at 23:26
1  
@DavidWilliams if isinstance(some_var, str) in Py3.x, or normally best to use if isinstance(some_var, basestring) in Py2.x, so it covers unicode and str – Jon Clements Apr 25 '13 at 23:27

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