Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have two projects, A and B, with B being a webapp. Project B depends on A, so A's ivy.xml looks something like:

<ivy-module version="2.0">
  <info organisation="com.confused" module="B" status="integration"/>    

  <dependencies>
    <!-- confused dependencies -->
    <dependency name="A" rev="latest.integration"/>

    <!-- 3rd party dependencies -->
    <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-core" rev="3.2.2.RELEASE"/>
    <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-jdbc" rev="3.2.2.RELEASE"/>
    <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-webmvc" rev="3.2.2.RELEASE"/>
  </dependencies>
</ivy-module>

something like that… and my A module looks like:

<ivy-module version="2.0">
  <info organisation="com.confused" module="A" status="integration"/>    

  <dependencies>
    <dependency org="org.slf4j" name="slf4j-api" rev="1.7.5"/>
    <dependency org="ch.qos.logback" name="logback-classic" rev="1.0.11"/>
    <dependency org="ch.qos.logback" name="logback-core" rev="1.0.11"/>
  </dependencies>
</ivy-module>

All good… except:

When I build B, the lib directory is populated with the spring jars along with A.jar. Fine and good, but if I want to 'deploy' my webapp, I need to copy these jars into WEB-INF/lib AND ALSO the logging jars that A depends on. How do I get ant/ivy to 'resolve' jars as well?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You didn't put the configuration your dependencies depend upon...

There is a sort of unofficial set of configurations that match up with Maven configurations that are used in the ivy.xml file. This ivy.template.xml file uses them, and I have that for my developers to base their ivy.xml files on.

What you need to do is map your configurations. Here's A's ivy.xml file:

<ivy-module version="2.0">
    <info organisation="com.confused" module="A" status="integration"/>    

    <configurations>
        <configuration .../>
        <!-- These are the configurations from the ivy.template.xml file -->
    </configurations>

    <dependencies>
        <dependency org="org.slf4j" name="slf4j-api" rev="1.7.5"
            conf="compile->default"/>
        <dependency org="ch.qos.logback" name="logback-classic" rev="1.0.11"
            conf="compile->default"/>
        <dependency org="ch.qos.logback" name="logback-core" rev="1.0.11"
            conf="compile->default"/>
    </dependencies>
</ivy-module>

Note the conf mappings! The compile->default says to use this for compile time, and for runtime dependencies. By mapping this to default, you are downloading not just this particular jar, but all transitive dependencies too.

Now, your ivy.xml for "B" will look like this:

<ivy-module version="2.0">
    <info organisation="com.confused" module="B" status="integration"/>    

    <configurations>
        <configuration .../>
        <!-- These are the configurations from the ivy.template.xml file -->
    </configurations>

    <dependencies>
        <!-- Don't forget the organisation field!-->
        <dependency org="com.confused" name="A" rev="latest.integration"
            conf="compile->default"/>

        <!-- 3rd party dependencies -->
        <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-core" rev="3.2.2.RELEASE"
            conf="compile->default"/>
        <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-jdbc" rev="3.2.2.RELEASE"
            conf="compile->default"/>
        <dependency org="org.springframework" name="spring-webmvc" rev="3.2.2.RELEASE"
            conf="compile->default"/>
    </dependencies>
</ivy-module>

Your project A's jar, and its dependencies are simply just another set of jars that your project "B" depends up.

Of course, you have to publish A's jar to your Ivy repository before "B" can use it.

share|improve this answer
    
Aye, I am a newb at this, and didn't fully understand configurations. I still don't, but I'm gonna go figure it out now! However, I figured out enough to prove you right, thank you very much! – ticktock Apr 26 '13 at 17:20
    
Configurations are a way to group your dependencies. For example, the standard is to have a "compile" configuration, a "test" configuration, and a "runtime" configuration. You could create a classpath using <ivy:cachepath pathid="main.classpath conf="compile"/>. That would only include the jars you need for compilation and not for testing or runtime. For your junit tests, you'd use something like <ivy:cachepath pathid="test.classpath conf="test"/>. The a->b mapping is a way to affect behavior and the standard configs I have match Maven's configuration. – David W. Apr 26 '13 at 17:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.