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data Tree a = Tree a [Tree a]

Note that we do not allow empty trees, and that a leaf is a tree with an empty list of subtrees.

treeFold :: (a -> [b] -> b) -> Tree a -> b
treeFold f (Tree x s) = f x (map (treeFold f) s)

Given the above information, I don't understand how the tree fold function returns a result by recursively applying the fold operation to the subtrees, then applying the function to the label at the root and the results returned from the subtrees.

I also do not get how the tree Fold function only takes one argument instead of 2, when it is passed as argument to the map function and it still compiles and runs properly.

For example, the tree size function below, counts the nodes of the tree.

treeSize :: Tree a -> Int
treeSize = treeFold (\x ys -> 1 + sum ys)

So running treeSize tree where tree = Tree 4 [Tree 1 [Tree 2 [], Tree 3 []]] gives the size of the tree as 4.

In the tree size function above, the tree fold function is also passed one argument instead of two. Also, the x that is passed to the tree fold function is not getting used anywhere, so why do you need it there. Removing it causes the program to not compile and it gives the following error message.

 Couldn't match type `a' with `[[Int] -> Int]'
      `a' is a rigid type variable bound by
          the type signature for treeSize :: Tree a -> Int
          at treeFold.hs:15:1
    In the first argument of `sum', namely `ys'
    In the second argument of `(+)', namely `sum ys'
    In the expression: 1 + sum ys

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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Why Functional Programming matters. –  Will Ness Apr 26 '13 at 23:34

2 Answers 2

Unused Arguments

First, the way you explicitly mark a variable as being unused is to replace the variable with _. So you really wanted:

treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys)

You got a compiler error because you wrote:

treeFold (\ys -> 1 + sum ys)

... which is not the same thing.

Folds

Second, I'll hand evaluate treeSize on an example tree so you can see that there is no magic going on:

treeSize (Tree 1 [Tree 2 [], Tree 3 []])

-- Inline definition of 'treeFold'
= treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys) (Tree 1 [Tree 2 [], Tree 3 []])

-- Evaluate treeFold
= (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys) 1 (map (treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys)) [Tree 2 [], Tree 3 []])

-- Apply the anonymous function
= 1 + sum (map (treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys)) [Tree 2 [], Tree 3 []])

-- Apply the 'map' function
= 1 + sum [ treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys) (Tree 2 [])
          , treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys) (Tree 3 [])
          ]

-- Apply both 'treeFold' functions
= 1 + sum [ (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys) 2 (map (treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys)) [])
          , (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys) 3 (map (treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys)) [])
          ]

-- Apply the anonymous functions
= 1 + sum [ 1 + sum (map (treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys)) [])
          , 1 + sum (map (treeFold (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys)) [])
          ]

-- map f [] = []
= 1 + sum [ 1 + sum []
          , 1 + sum []
          ]

-- sum [] = 0
= 1 + sum [1 + 0, 1 + 0]
= 1 + sum [1, 1]

-- Apply 'sum'
= 1 + 2
= 3

However, there's an easy way to remember how treeFold works. All it does it replace each Tree constructor with the function that you supply it with.

So if you have:

Tree 1 [Tree 2 [Tree 3 [], Tree 4[]], Tree 5 [Tree 6 [], Tree 7 []]]

... and you apply treeFold f to that, it will evaluate to:

f 1 [f 2 [f 3 [], f 4 []], f 5 [f 6 [], f 7 []]]

treeSum is just the special case where f = (\_ ys -> 1 + sum ys):

1 + sum [1 + sum [1 + sum [], 1 + sum []], 1 + sum [1 + sum [], 1 + sum []]]

= 7

Currying

The final point is how currying works in Haskell. When you define a function like:

foo x y = x + y

... the compiler actually desugars that to two nested functions:

foo = \x -> (\y -> x + y)

This is why you can partially apply functions to just one argument in Haskell. When you write foo 1, it translates to:

foo 1

= (\x -> (\y -> x + y)) 1

= \y -> 1 + y

In other words, it returns a new function of one argument.

In Haskell, all functions take exactly one argument, and we simulate functions of multiple arguments by returning new functions. This technique is known as "currying".

If you prefer the multi-argument approach of more traditional mainstream languages, you can simulate it by having the function accept a tuple argument:

f (x, y) = x + y

However, that's not really idiomatic Haskell, and it won't give you any sort of performance improvement.

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The first question is a bit tricky, because that's the thing with recursion... As teachers say: "To understand recursion, you have to learn, how recursion works". :-P One little advice: Try going through the application of treeFold with a single Tree or a Tree with one Tree inside and evaluate it by your own (on a paper or so). I think, then you could get a feeling about what is going on... (of course use a simple function as an argument for treeFold; like that, which your treeSize uses).

treeFoldgets only one argument in the map body, because map requires a function from a->b, and treeFold has the type (a -> [b] -> b) -> Tree a -> b., so if you would pass it 2 arguments, you would pass to map only a value, which causes a failure. (An understandable example: (+) requires two arguments. If you write map (+1) [1,2,3] you'll get [2,3,4] , because (+1) is applied to each element in the list (and (+1) clearly needs one more argument, as your treeFold f above)

Your example treeSize : It's not right, when you say, that it only gets one argument. You could write

treeSize t = treeFold (\x ys -> 1 + sum ys) t

instead of your definition above. The x isn't used because for counting it is useless.But, treeFold needs to have a function, that takes two arguments, so you give it the x. That's the only reason. You could pass any other value.

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I have tried going through treeFold with a single Tree but still do not get it. If you have a function called add which adds two numbers, then you would write is as add x y = x + y. When you pass add to map as its first argument, as in map (add 5) [1,2,3], it returns [6,7,8]. But then you are only passing in one argument to add also. Where does it get the other argument from? So x and y are two arguments passed to treeFold. –  Ishan Apr 26 '13 at 3:13
2  
@Ishan: Perhaps it's clearer if you write it as map (\x -> add 5 x) [1, 2, 3]. But then \x -> add 5 x is the same as add 5 via eta reduction. –  hammar Apr 26 '13 at 3:22

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